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The Rusk's tutorial appears to be offline, possibly due to hosting charges.
 

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As a journeyman Machinist....

My very first thought was the removal of that much of the splines on the end of the driveshaft. It is a rare thing that more than what is needed is used in a mechanical application, and it is always built to a strength factor x % over max stress ratio. Since you mention that some have done this without the shortening of the driveshaft, has anyone ever done an exact measurement from the 1400 rear end face to the max safe length into the U joint splines, and the face of the U Joint? That would seem like the first thing that you would do on a mod like this.

Am I correct in assuming that the shoulder MUST be machined back in order for the VL800/C50 shaft to fit between the 1400 unit and the U joint? Or is that not tampered with either when the mod is done without machining? (That wasn't real clear) I can see that there very well could be enough room into the U joint for the shaft to extend without binding on the rear portion of the joint. But I am guessing that from the mounted face of the 1400/1500 unit and the face of the U joint it must be shortened or it will bind ?

As I am also a lifetime certified all position welder in TIG, MIG, stick, gas, and sub-arc. Cutting and welding a spec tempered driveshaft would be my last choice, and definitely a jig welding application.

I am not trying to stir up anything here, but this seems to leave a lot of questions open as to if the basic measurements were even done.

Marty
 

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Yes, measurements were done. Yes, there was some that ran the splines deeper into the joint but decided that wasn't a good solution. I think I remember one person having some serious problems with the splines in too deep. My guess is the measurements were made from comparing existing parts in the shop. From what I have read, the first person, DJ, to make the mod had a good reputation for working on motorcycles. I don't know if DJ put the shafts into the joint to visually inspect the connection but it wouldn't surprise me if he did - I just don't remember reading about it. Someone else may be able to answer better.

For the most, 99.9% of the people doing this modification really like it. I know I like it. It was easy to do and made a big difference in high speed (for the c50) riding.
 

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Yes, measurements were done. Yes, there was some that ran the splines deeper into the joint but decided that wasn't a good solution. I think I remember one person having some serious problems with the splines in too deep. My guess is the measurements were made from comparing existing parts in the shop. From what I have read, the first person, DJ, to make the mod had a good reputation for working on motorcycles. I don't know if DJ put the shafts into the joint to visually inspect the connection but it wouldn't surprise me if he did - I just don't remember reading about it. Someone else may be able to answer better.

For the most, 99.9% of the people doing this modification really like it. I know I like it. It was easy to do and made a big difference in high speed (for the c50) riding.
When I actually get some riding time on mine come spring, Then I will see if I would like to do something like this. So far I have ridden it 1 mile lol. I did notice that shifting by the sound of the motor in that one mile it is a very short first gears, and saw the speed shift points in the owners manual, they are really low.

Thanks !
Marty
 

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You can rev it up some more. Some people talk about shifting from 1st to 2nd when turning. I didn't do that. I let the revs go up a little more and shifted to 2nd after the turn. After the modified drive, the shift to 2nd definitely doesn't feel needed until after a turn.

With there only being 5 gears, that means you will be turning a lot of RPMs at high speeds (70mph+). You can run the RPMs up without a problem in lower gears too, it will just sound different to your ears as compared to the low growl you are used to but you will get used to the sounds you normally create with the engine - no matter what that is.
 

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I have a 07 C50 with the wire spoked wheels. If I purchase the axle spacer for a VS1400, will I still need to shave it down?
Yes you will.
Not only do you need to worry about the splines end hitting the u-joint one should be concerned of the preload on the shaft spring. You should not just machine the shoulder back 3/16 of an inch so you have a bit of shoulder left. Although this works but do you really want to be doing 70mph and not have the preload and deflection clearences (when the swingarm swings) that suzuki intended?
To get the proper preload the splined end of the shaft needs to be welded and machined back almost 3/8 of an inch.
That is the way I made all mine.
I do have all the parts to assemble one if anyone would like one.

Sent from my SM-T900 using Tapatalk
 

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"That is the way I made all mine.
I do have all the parts to assemble one if anyone would like one."

That sounds like me! Can we discuss this off line?
 

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Discussion Starter #169
Notice: I’m re-posting these instructions because I've asked Photobucket to delete my account, and I'm unable to modify my original post. Feel free to delete this post and/or modify the original with the updated links...

These instructions will explain the basic tools, items and modifications necessary to install a VS1400 drive assembly on a VL800/C50 using a VL800/C50 driveshaft and spacer.

What’s the purpose of this modification?
To achieve a higher/sustainable top speed
To reduce engine vibration from high RPMs while traveling 70+ MPH
To increase fuel efficiency (arguably)

Tools Needed:
Metric box wrench set (up to 22mm)
Metric socket set
*Torque wrench
Metric Allen wrench set
Snap ring wrench (straight/inner)
Needle nose pliers
*Rubber or plastic mallet
Several round rat tail files (or a ½” drill bit)
*Corded drill
Small parts brush
Bike lift or equivalent

Items Needed:
VS1400 final drive assembly (SKU: 27300-38845)
VS1400 spring for driveshaft (SKU: 09440-30008 )
C50/VL800 drive shaft (SKU: 27151-41F00)
C50 or VS1400 axel spacer (SKU: 64772-34201 or SKU: 09180-17088 )
VS1400 oil seal (SKU: 09283-30026)
VS1400 circlip (SKU: 09381-40003)
*Cotter pin (SKU: 04111-40308 )
Honda Molly 60 paste (or equivalent)
75W-90 gear oil

* Indicates optional

While the VS1400 drive assembly uses the same diameter driveshaft as the VL800/C50, the C50 driveshaft and spacer will need modifications to work properly with the VS1400 drive assembly. Otherwise, the driveshaft may put undue stress on the bearings.

As you can see, the VL800/C50 driveshaft is much larger than the VS1400 driveshaft:


This is a VL800/C50 driveshaft after it has been machined; modifications from the original driveshaft are noted in red:


The original VL800/C50 spacer can be shortened by 2mm, or it can replace it with another spacer that’s 2 7/8” in length. Make sure the replacement spacer is hardened steel. Here’s a stock VS1400 spacer next to a replacement spacer:



A replacement oil seal and cir-clip should be purchased from a Suzuki dealer. While the original cir-clip may be in good condition, it’s better to have a spare on hand in case the original breaks during assembly.



Pick up some Honda Molly 60 grease (or equivalent) from a local Honda dealer. Make sure the grease contains at least 44% molly (as recommended by Suzuki). Standard automotive molly grease should not be used as it does not offer adequate protection. The molly grease will be applied using a small parts brush to the splines on the driveshaft and drive assembly. I also applied it to the axle shaft and spacers.


Find a well lit/flat surface to work on; this modification can take several hours to complete so plan for enough time (it took me approximately 2 hours). Secure the bike to the stand and proceed to remove the drive assembly using the Rusks’ “Checking Driveshaft Lubrication” guide found on the VR site.

It’s a good idea to put something underneath the front tire to help support the bike. When you remove the drive assembly and wheel, the bike becomes front heavy and may try tipping over.


Using a file (or ½” drill bit if preferred), enlarge the mounting holes for the VS1400 drive assembly. Take your time and make sure everything is lined up properly by test fitting the drive assembly multiple times. Forcing the drive assembly onto the frame will damage the threads on drive assembly. I used a rat tail file with a high speed drill to elongate the holes.


Attach the modified driveshaft to the VS1400 drive assembly using the cir-clip. Slide the seal onto the driveshaft and push it down until it is flush with the drive assembly. The seal keeps the molly grease in and contaminants out.


Slide the driveshaft into the u-joint and secure the drive assembly to the frame. If the shaft will not go back in all the way, try rotating it. If that doesn’t work, pull the drive assembly back out and try using a long broom handle to realign the u-joint that’s inside the bike (you may need to use a flashlight to see if the u-joint is straight). It took me a couple tries to get it to align properly.



Now is a good time to check your rear brakes for wear and/or clean them.


Insert the modified (or new) spacer into the VS1400 drive assembly. Assemble the wheel and brakes in the reverse order of the Rusks’ guide mentioned above. If possible, use a torque wrench and tighten everything up to specification (foot pounds can be found in a service manual). I didn’t have a torque wrench on hand, so I used the ole’ GNT (good n’ tight) scale. Once everything is back together, put the bike in neutral and gently spin the rear wheel. It will spin smoothly if everything is aligned properly. Fill the drive assembly with gear oil and you are done!


Take it easy on the drive for a little while. If something isn’t aligned properly, it will likely present itself within the first ~100 miles. Just like new brakes, gears take a little time to “mesh” together. Also, park the bike in an area where it can be monitored for minor oil leaks.
 
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