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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi All,

I would appreciate everybody'd feedback on the accessories I'm planning to get.

Preamble:
The weather has been nice to us here in Brooklyn, NY (knock on wood) with few rains and 45`F - 55`F and clear sky. My commute is a fairly short 25 minute / 5 mile ride to work (rush hour stop and go traffic city streets), so I'm not planning to invest into heated gear just yet. That said, once it start dipping into 15-30'F, rain and snow, I will probably put the bike away for the winter. I'm parking my bike in a building garage, that is somewhat heated and mostly isolated from wind and elements with exception of some water puddles during the heavy storms.



I have access to an electrical outlet nearby, and have enough space to put my bike up on a stand. I can't always justify (to myself) the need for top name brand service tools or equipment, unless I will be paying again for cheap tools. Everything on the list is home-gamer grade, and I intend to do as much of the motorcycle service myself as I possible. This will be used on a Suzuki C50 2008 at the time. Please do let me know if I should add missing tools/accessories or replace certain things to make them more universal.

Tools and equipment list:

1) $70 with coupon before taxes - 1500 lbs. Capacity ATV/Motorcycle Lift Pittsburgh®️ Automotive- Item#61632 Harbor Freight Motorcycle Lift. This one might be a little sketchy, and not that stable, but it is inexpensive, and I intend to use it for winter storage and periodic maintenance only. Any alternatives? Let me know what you think.

2) $12 before taxes
. I do have a heavy duty Guardian by Dowco 50004-02 that I used briefly for outside storage (1.5 months), but it is not breathable enough (I think).

3) $24.32 before taxes -
. Are there any better alternatives or this is the best under $30 mark?

4) $32 before tax - Trimax THEX50 THEX Super Chain - 5' Length with HEX 11mm Links


5) $102 before taxes - Kryptonite New York Standard Heavy Duty Bicycle U Lock Bike Lock

6) $3 - Meguiar's MC20306 Motorcycle Leather Cleaner and Conditioner - 6 oz.

7) $5 - A can of WD40 (spray exhaust pipes)

8") $32 before tax - WIEGMANN RSC Gray Metal Weatherproof Exterior New Work Standard Enclosure Wall Electrical Box to house the battery maintainer and slack cable when not in use. Don't want to leave the battery maintainer dangling by/under bike to avoid theft and potential issues with puddles of water=short circuit under the bike.

9) $20 - extension cord and a length of plastic wire loom.

10) $12 - STA-BIL 22274 Fuel Stabilizer.

11) $0 - battery ring terminal (already installed on a bike for cell phone charger).

12) $0 - Old rugs.

I realize that not everything on the list is necessary needed, e.g. chain and lock, but I already have them and I'm parking in a building garage for extended time, so security is necessary for me. Is there anything else that I might have missed?

P.S. I’ve changed oil, final drive oil, spark plugs and coolant the beginning of October ‘18.

P.P.S. Am I going overboard with all this and should I just leave the bike as is?

:brick::blackeye:
 

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Hi All,

I would appreciate everybody'd feedback on the accessories I'm planning to get.

Preamble:
The weather has been nice to us here in Brooklyn, NY (knock on wood) with few rains and 45`F - 55`F and clear sky. My commute is a fairly short 25 minute / 5 mile ride to work (rush hour stop and go traffic city streets), so I'm not planning to invest into heated gear just yet. That said, once it start dipping into 15-30'F, rain and snow, I will probably put the bike away for the winter. I'm parking my bike in a building garage, that is somewhat heated and mostly isolated from wind and elements with exception of some water puddles during the heavy storms.



I have access to an electrical outlet nearby, and have enough space to put my bike up on a stand. I can't always justify (to myself) the need for top name brand service tools or equipment, unless I will be paying again for cheap tools. Everything on the list is home-gamer grade, and I intend to do as much of the motorcycle service myself as I possible. This will be used on a Suzuki C50 2008 at the time. Please do let me know if I should add missing tools/accessories or replace certain things to make them more universal.

Tools and equipment list:

1) $70 with coupon before taxes - 1500 lbs. Capacity ATV/Motorcycle Lift Pittsburgh®️ Automotive- Item#61632 Harbor Freight Motorcycle Lift. This one might be a little sketchy, and not that stable, but it is inexpensive, and I intend to use it for winter storage and periodic maintenance only. Any alternatives? Let me know what you think.

2) $12 before taxes OxGord Indoor Dust Cover for Touring Motorcycles. I do have a heavy duty Guardian by Dowco 50004-02 that I used briefly for outside storage (1.5 months), but it is not breathable enough (I think).

3) $24.32 before taxes - Battery Tender 021-0123 Battery Tender Junior 12V, 0.75A Battery Charger. Are there any better alternatives or this is the best under $30 mark?

4) $32 before tax - Trimax THEX50 THEX Super Chain - 5' Length with HEX 11mm Links


5) $102 before taxes - Kryptonite New York Standard Heavy Duty Bicycle U Lock Bike Lock

6) $3 - Meguiar's MC20306 Motorcycle Leather Cleaner and Conditioner - 6 oz.

7) $5 - A can of WD40 (spray exhaust pipes)

8") $32 before tax - WIEGMANN RSC Gray Metal Weatherproof Exterior New Work Standard Enclosure Wall Electrical Box to house the battery maintainer and slack cable when not in use. Don't want to leave the battery maintainer dangling by/under bike to avoid theft and potential issues with puddles of water=short circuit under the bike.

9) $20 - extension cord and a length of plastic wire loom.

10) $12 - STA-BIL 22274 Fuel Stabilizer.

11) $0 - battery ring terminal (already installed on a bike for cell phone charger).

12) $0 - Old rugs.

I realize that not everything on the list is necessary needed, e.g. chain and lock, but I already have them and I'm parking in a building garage for extended time, so security is necessary for me. Is there anything else that I might have missed?

P.S. I’ve changed oil, final drive oil, spark plugs and coolant the beginning of October ‘18.

P.P.S. Am I going overboard with all this and should I just leave the bike as is?

Rather than arrange the battery charger connection where your bike will be stored, pull the battery and take it in the house with you. You can get a plastic container from walmart or a hardware store to hold the battery and isolate it from contact with acid sensitive material.... and then you can arrange the charging as you wish.


Place the bike on the carpet if you wish - only inflate the tires about 5 psi over the regular pressure while the bike is stored.

Steel wool in the ends of the pipes and something in the air intake TO THE air filter as well will keep the mice out.

The rest of your plan sounds reasonable as well.

PS, you might consider removing the seat/s and storing them inside as well. - that is what I do when my storage is unseated.
 

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Frankly, you're going way overboard. When I put my bike away each winter, I top up the tank, add some.Startron stabilizer fill the tires to 45 PSI, attach the battery tender, put the cover on it and say goodnight. Granted, I'm not in NYC and my personal property does not routinely grow legs and wander off. Unless you are chaining the bike to a pillar or other immovable object, bike locks don't work. It's just as easy to pick it up and throw it in a van as opposed to taking the time to try to cut the locks. You don't need the stand, or the box or much of what you have listed. Also, if you plan to ride it in between cold spells, find a car wash and hose the salt off asap. It only has to be cold for them to salt the streets. That mixed with water will rust your chrome in a matter of days if you don't get it off right away.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Rather than arrange the battery charger connection where your bike will be stored, pull the battery and take it in the house with you. You can get a plastic container from walmart or a hardware store to hold the battery and isolate it from contact with acid sensitive material.... and then you can arrange the charging as you wish.


Place the bike on the carpet if you wish - only inflate the tires about 5 psi over the regular pressure while the bike is stored.

Steel wool in the ends of the pipes and something in the air intake TO THE air filter as well will keep the mice out.

The rest of your plan sounds reasonable as well.

PS, you might consider removing the seat/s and storing them inside as well. - that is what I do when my storage is unseated.
Thanks! Wouldn't steel wool corrode and potential transfer corosion to the exhaust pipes? I have Vance & Hines straight shots.

I'm lazy (I think? :neutral:), so I don't want to remove the battery and store yet another bike related item in my apartment - wife and little on would not approve :crying2:. Also, I can always jump back on a bike, and ride it should the weather permit.
You've mentioned isolating acid - is there a chance that battery would leak while installed on the bike (I believe mine is sealed, but hey?)?

I'm a little concerned about dry rot (not sure how/what it really is). Rug will probably absorb moisture and transfer it to the bike (see water puddles above).

What is the benefit of removing the seat if it will be stored in somewhat warm garage?
 

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Unless you have actual leather on the bike, there's no chance of any rot during storage. The vinyl used on bikes is sturdy, uv stable and meant to be in damp conditions. Steel wool in the exhaust and intake boot may draw damp, but it is the softer material, so it will not harm the other metals, even if it does rust. My bike sits under a covered porch with three sides open to the elements. I may get a slight petina on the rotor at the end of winter, but it is nothing to worry about.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Frankly, you're going way overboard. When I put my bike away each winter, I top up the tank, add some.Startron stabilizer fill the tires to 45 PSI, attach the battery tender, put the cover on it and say goodnight. Granted, I'm not in NYC and my personal property does not routinely grow legs and wander off. Unless you are chaining the bike to a pillar or other immovable object, bike locks don't work. It's just as easy to pick it up and throw it in a van as opposed to taking the time to try to cut the locks. You don't need the stand, or the box or much of what you have listed. Also, if you plan to ride it in between cold spells, find a car wash and hose the salt off asap. It only has to be cold for them to salt the streets. That mixed with water will rust your chrome in a matter of days if you don't get it off right away.
Thanks!
Any difference between Startron stabilizer vs Sta-Bil?

Garage is locked, and I do intend to chain it to a crash guard on a wall. It might seam a bit extreme, but NYC is probably the worst place to have a motorcycle/bicycle and store it not in your private garage. A few of my friends learned the hard way...

Great tip about salt and washing the bike after a ride! :idea:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Unless you have actual leather on the bike, there's no chance of any rot during storage. The vinyl used on bikes is sturdy, uv stable and meant to be in damp conditions. Steel wool in the exhaust and intake boot may draw damp, but it is the softer material, so it will not harm the other metals, even if it does rust. My bike sits under a covered porch with three sides open to the elements. I may get a slight petina on the rotor at the end of winter, but it is nothing to worry about.
Great, thank you!

P.S. I'm probably going overboard - my first bike :)
 

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Most of your plans are sound and some of the advise is good. I'll add my 2 cents to the thread....

DO NOT USE STAB-BIL. Look through some of the threads here and you'll find a number of members have had issues with it. (Some have not). Top the tank off and throw a can of Seafoam in it. It will preserve the fuel through the winter and clean things out in the summer.

If you are storing the bike in a garage with a concrete floor and you are worried about moisture, put it on a sheet of plywood covered by a good tarp. Concrete "breathes" and can release moisture. I put all my classic cars on heavy tarps when I store them.

The steel wool trick is a good one. Use it on my cars. The only thing I do differently, is ball it up in a thin rag with a dryer sheet and tie a long string on it. I stuff the wad into the exhaust and leave the string hanging to pull it all out in the spring. Rodents HATE dryer sheets and I put them liberally around and inside the car. I do the same with my bikes, stuffing them in the frame, putting them in the saddlebags and in my spokes. Smell better than moth balls.

Be sure to change the oil before you store it too and give it a nice bath and a good waxing.
 

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I store my ride in my garage...lucky me...I do try to ride year round if the weather and road conditions permit but where I am and where you are...its two different worlds...I grew up on long island,,,Hicksville mostly, lived in queens for a while too. I personally wouldn't ride in the winter months in your area if nothing more than the fact that the last thing people expect to see is a mc...I'm sure some do it...your choice. I have always used stabil and never had an issue...I also would recommend removing the battery and bringing it indoors like suggested. I wouldn't worry so much about the stand but I would occasionally move it six inches or so to prevent the tires from sitting on the same spot...leave yourself a reminder somewhere on the bike to check your pressures...we are so quick to want to just get out and ride when an opportunity presents itself, we don't realize that theres a good chance the tires have lost some air and that can pose some problems the way a mc rides if they drop too low. Being stored indoors in a somewhat heated garage should offer you the protection you need from the elements really doing any harm. Peronally think you should be ok...the tarp underneath is a good suggestion...I use one in my garage. Good luck.
 

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If you don't want to spend the money on a bike stand (which is a good investment for future use) cut a piece of plywood 12in by 12 in and glue a piece of carpet to it and park your wheels on it .
when I was snow birding to Florida I left my bike on cement for 6 months and the tires got flat spots ,but once I used the carpet they stayed fine.


also I learned from this site that if the tires get flat spots let the air out and turn the flat spot on top of the wheel and over fill the tires and ride to make the flat spots disappear then adjust air to proper pressure ,it worked!
 

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The stand isn't a necessity but it comes in handy when doing maintenance and cleaning. If you get one, get some ratchet straps to secure it to the stand. My grand son almost tipped mine off the stand when he bumped into it running thru the garage.
 

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Best solution : Send bike south, our riding season is just beginning, then pick up in 5 months :D

Listen to the guys above who have dealt with this **** before.
Altho, mine's sat for 3-4 months & I just added Seafoam & jump started it when it warmed up (I never "planned" on letting it sit that long but my body had other plans)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Most of your plans are sound and some of the advise is good. I'll add my 2 cents to the thread....

DO NOT USE STAB-BIL. Look through some of the threads here and you'll find a number of members have had issues with it. (Some have not). Top the tank off and throw a can of Seafoam in it. It will preserve the fuel through the winter and clean things out in the summer.

If you are storing the bike in a garage with a concrete floor and you are worried about moisture, put it on a sheet of plywood covered by a good tarp. Concrete "breathes" and can release moisture. I put all my classic cars on heavy tarps when I store them.

The steel wool trick is a good one. Use it on my cars. The only thing I do differently, is ball it up in a thin rag with a dryer sheet and tie a long string on it. I stuff the wad into the exhaust and leave the string hanging to pull it all out in the spring. Rodents HATE dryer sheets and I put them liberally around and inside the car. I do the same with my bikes, stuffing them in the frame, putting them in the saddlebags and in my spokes. Smell better than moth balls.

Be sure to change the oil before you store it too and give it a nice bath and a good waxing.
I've just changed the oil in the beginning of October (shortly after I've got the bike). Do you suggest I do it again?

From little research that I've done, Seafom is a hit and miss as well. Haven't researched Sta-Bil: I suppose I need to do more reading.

The heavy tarp and plywood sounds good! I have some foam floor tiles: I believe will provide a similar result.

The string+dryer sheets is a good trick: makes it easier to take the bike out for a ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I store my ride in my garage...lucky me...I do try to ride year round if the weather and road conditions permit but where I am and where you are...its two different worlds...I grew up on long island,,,Hicksville mostly, lived in queens for a while too. I personally wouldn't ride in the winter months in your area if nothing more than the fact that the last thing people expect to see is a mc...I'm sure some do it...your choice. I have always used stabil and never had an issue...I also would recommend removing the battery and bringing it indoors like suggested. I wouldn't worry so much about the stand but I would occasionally move it six inches or so to prevent the tires from sitting on the same spot...leave yourself a reminder somewhere on the bike to check your pressures...we are so quick to want to just get out and ride when an opportunity presents itself, we don't realize that theres a good chance the tires have lost some air and that can pose some problems the way a mc rides if they drop too low. Being stored indoors in a somewhat heated garage should offer you the protection you need from the elements really doing any harm. Peronally think you should be ok...the tarp underneath is a good suggestion...I use one in my garage. Good luck.
Thank you for sound advise! If I will be using a battery maintainer while the motorcycle is stored for the winter, do I really need to take off the battery? What is the benefit/necessary of taking the battery off the bike?
 

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Best solution : Send bike south, our riding season is just beginning, then pick up in 5 months :D

Listen to the guys above who have dealt with this **** before.
Altho, mine's sat for 3-4 months & I just added Seafoam & jump started it when it warmed up (I never "planned" on letting it sit that long but my body had other plans)
"Send the bike south [...]" I'd love to do that, but only with me as a package deal :smile2:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The stand isn't a necessity but it comes in handy when doing maintenance and cleaning. If you get one, get some ratchet straps to secure it to the stand. My grand son almost tipped mine off the stand when he bumped into it running thru the garage.
+1 on ratchets - I do have a few laying around - forgot to list them in the initial post.

I will probably hold off on the stand until I have some cash laying around. Changing oil, coolant, and adding accessories and taking-off the rear fender and saddle bags was a small nightmare :curse:

With the holiday season approaching and a recent motorcycle + gear + service + bike accessories + etc. I think I will have to do with necessities for now.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
If you don't want to spend the money on a bike stand (which is a good investment for future use) cut a piece of plywood 12in by 12 in and glue a piece of carpet to it and park your wheels on it .
when I was snow birding to Florida I left my bike on cement for 6 months and the tires got flat spots ,but once I used the carpet they stayed fine.


also I learned from this site that if the tires get flat spots let the air out and turn the flat spot on top of the wheel and over fill the tires and ride to make the flat spots disappear then adjust air to proper pressure ,it worked!
I'm on the fence regarding the stand. I'm worried that Harbor Freight stands are not strong/sturdy enough (search for Youtube videos) and I don't really want to spend $400 on a name brand. I'm sure a stand will come-in very handy for future maintenance and make storage easier. Buying used (if I can find one) is probably not the best idea either.
 

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Thank you for sound advise! If I will be using a battery maintainer while the motorcycle is stored for the winter, do I really need to take off the battery? What is the benefit/necessary of taking the battery off the bike?
you don't need to remove the battery if its on a tender, for me it was just another measure of keeping the battery fresher in a warmer setting, basicly what the tender I assume is suppose to do... keeping it fully charged. You could also look at it as an added security measure also. No battery...harder to start. Harder to steal.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
you don't need to remove the battery if its on a tender, for me it was just another measure of keeping the battery fresher in a warmer setting, basicly what the tender I assume is suppose to do... keeping it fully charged. You could also look at it as an added security measure also. No battery...harder to start. Harder to steal.
Got it, thanks!
 
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