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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Preparing the bike
1. Put the bike on the bike jack.
2. Raise all the way up
3. Lower the jack's safety rod and lower the bike onto the highest stop point.
4. Secure the bike to to the jack with straps

Things I had to remove from the bike

1. Speedo
2. Seat
3. Tank
4. Both the Left and right side covers
5. Right side neck cover (key cover)
6. Air filter box and snorkel (every thing) - Follow service manual procedure
7. Throttle Body - Completely remove, and let it hang over the frame on the throttle wires. - Follow service manual procedure.
8. Rear cylinder, left side chrome cover
9. Front cylinder, right side chrome cover
10. Both spark plugs
11. Pair valve chrome tube attached to the rear cylinder, 2 small bolts on the rear of the rear cylinders.
12. All the valve covers. This was tricky, I hand to make a trip to Sears to get a Metric Flex socket set because I couldn't figure and other way to remove a few of the cover bolts.
13. Both the crank cover and the flywheel inspection window.

I used the feeler gauge method, and didn't have a problem getting the feeler gauge to get in under the tappets. I had to bend them into a "z" to get them to fit, but that was no big deal. And with the throttle body removed, I had more room to work. I wouldn't think twice about removing the throttle body again. It was easy off and easy on.
Also, I have read that many people here have been having trouble finding top dead center. This confused me too at first, so here is what I have learned.
To find Top dead center you fist have to know which are the exhaust and which are the intake valves. Pretty easy, exhaust valves are near the exhaust pipes, and the intake valves are near the center of the cylinder. So the outer most set of valves on both cylinders are the exhaust valves.
Next you have to know the sequence of the firing cycle. Also easy:
1. Exhaust valves open (valves go down)
2. Exhaust valves close (valves goes up)
3. Intake valves open (intake valves go down)
4. Intake Valves close ( intake valves go up)

As the intake valves are coming up (closing) the cylinder is approaching Top Dead Center.

What the book says, and what everyone has writing on this subject, is that once you see the intake valves coming up look into the flywheel inspection window and turn the engine slowly to look for the RT or the FT mark (depending on which cylinder you are working on). Although this is correct, people have failed to mention that if you start looking as soon as you see the intake valves coming up you still have to crank the engine a good deal to get to the proper mark.
This through me, I guess because I wasn't expecting it to be so long. So I came up with this:

***At the time this was totally original on my part and I was patting myself on the back for coming up with it, but I have since learned it's an old trick, bummer, but it works.***

When the intake valve were starting to close, I took a very long, very thin screwdriver and stuck it into the spark plug whole and felt the top of the piston, (BTW, the top of the piston was pretty black, but I have also learned that's normal) as I cranked the engine toward Top Dead Center I was able to watch the screw driver rise out of the spark plus hole. When the proper mark (either RT or FT) showed up in the window, the screwdriver was all the up, out of the spark plug whole. Thus I have found Top Dead Center on the compression stroke and was able to make my adjustments.

For the adjustments I followed OregonLAN's Guide http://www.volusiariders.com/58-motors-transmissions-drives/194819-how-guide-adjusting-your-valves-101-pics-vid.html in the sticky section of this part of the board. He did a great job, and his work really helped me a great deal, Thank you.

So after I finished the rear cylinders adjustment, I buttoned everything up, because I'm a little anal and I didn't want to forget where things went. I put the valves covers back on, put the new spark plug in, and put the the chrome covers back before moving over to the other side of the bike to start the adjustments on the front cylinder.

MISTAKE.... You can't put either of the sparks plug back until you are finished with the valve adjustments. Why?, because you wont be able to turn the engine over with one the sparks plugs in. The compression air needs needs someplace to go, and it goes out the spake plug hole.
I didn't realize that, live and learn, and now maybe the next member here will.

My adjustment turned out just fine, no problems, but it took me all afternoon, about 5 hours. I think next time it will go much quicker now that i know what to expect. I hope others who sit through this post can learn from some of my mistakes, benefit from some of my experiences, and realize that this necessary maintenance procedure is very doable by anybody.

Thanks for reading, James.
 

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:applause::shades:
made a sticky..........GJ!
 

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Thanks, gotta do this and feel a little easier about doing it.
 

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Another little tip or tool, make a balloon tube to help you find TDC on the compression stroke. I took an old spark plug gutted it and put an ink pen housing on it and a small piece of a plastic bag on it. When the rotation start the compression stroke the bag expands then all you have to do is line up the TDC mark. Works pretty good.

 

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Like Roadster said. Only i found a old circuit tester and pulled the wire out and it made a perfect fit for the sparkplug hole. Tied a cut off finger of a latex gloves and tied it to the opposite end and voila :).

Henry
 

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I was wondering the same thing. Seems like a lot of tear down if it's not necessary. How do you know if you need to adjust??


Sent from my Motorcycle iPhone app
 

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The owners manual specifiys the interval (7500 mi).
Better to do it it nad not have to than drop a valve or burn one.
 

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valve job

Hi Guys,

I just did the valves on my 2008 C50T this weekend and it was a pain in the butt! Which raised two questions:

1 - What tool do you use to remove the 8mm bolt on the left side of the front cylinder exhaust valve cover?
2 - and what do you use to remove the 10mm nut on the rear cylinder intake valve cover?

I went to Canadian Tire and UAP NAPA stores to find a tool, but they had nothing that would fit.

There's not a lot of room to work with! I ended up using a socket held by a vise-grip, but it's not practical and I don't like the fact that it damages sockets.

Thanks,

Frank
 

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James P I have to thank you for your informative post. I started to do my valve adjustment, got as far as tank off and chrome covers off and looked at was left to come off and decided against the job. One reason is I have the 2006 c50t raised up on a bike lift, but arthritis in my back gets pretty sore bending over that long.
I have 7,500 miles on it and the valves were done at the 600 mile check up. Im told it is something that must be done. How critical is this. If need be Ill have to go to the dealer. Is there a standard charge for this and if so, what might that be? Thanks again, I really could have used all your experience. Ron
 

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James P I have to thank you for your informative post. I started to do my valve adjustment, got as far as tank off and chrome covers off and looked at was left to come off and decided against the job. One reason is I have the 2006 c50t raised up on a bike lift, but arthritis in my back gets pretty sore bending over that long.
I have 7,500 miles on it and the valves were done at the 600 mile check up. Im told it is something that must be done. How critical is this. If need be Ill have to go to the dealer. Is there a standard charge for this and if so, what might that be? Thanks again, I really could have used all your experience. Ron
The 7500 mile valve check is critical. I'd shop this job to the dealer and other shops in your area. When asking, use the terms valve adjustment check. The price may differ from $200 to $500. Ask what exactly they intend to do and can you watch? As you can see in the OP sticky, there is not much to the adjustment, it's all the labor that's required to get to the valve tappets and does require a special tool set at times. Good luck.
 

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As the intake valves are coming up (closing) the cylinder is approaching Top Dead Center.
Huh? This engine ain't gonna run if the intake valve is open when the piston is on its way up. Does he mean as the exhaust valve is closing?
 

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Throttle body tough to remove

The throttle body on my '05 C50T won't come off. I don't want to mess with the rubber holding it on too much for fear of ripping it. Thought of using something like WD-40 to maybe seep in there and loosen the bond, but not sure if that will damage the rubber. Agree that it'd be easier if it was out of the way though.[/SIZE][/COLOR][/FONT]
 
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