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I have a 2004 Volusia. Just got it from the shop getting the carb adjusted as it was not starting for me. Here in Missouri regular gas has ethanol added and a fellow rider (Victory) suggested I use a Premium gas grade. What are your thoughts on this subject?
 

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Loudpipe....why would you even think about using that crap in your bike or any thing else you want to last. No offence......you must be a roukee!!!!1
 

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Ethanol is old news it's been in the Washington State gas I have been using for way more than 10 years. When it was first introduced some 15 years or so ago I avoided it for at least a year as I knew it would remove standing water from the gas station tanks.

Using Ethanol-free gas stations in the U.S. and Canada I recently found out the available gas only accessible by boat at the Marina I keep my boat at is ethanol free. No difference I can really notice. But I do put run some SeaFoam thru the boats out board motor now and again and SeaFoam is about 30% alcohol. With the % of alcohol seasonally adjusted with a little more alcohol in the mix in winter to help remove water from your gas system.
 

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I have a 2004 Volusia. Just got it from the shop getting the carb adjusted as it was not starting for me. Here in Missouri regular gas has ethanol added and a fellow rider (Victory) suggested I use a Premium gas grade. What are your thoughts on this subject?

Alcohol as a gas additive will raise the octane rating of gas. Gas is labeled as premium when it has a higher Octane rating than regular or lower octane rated gas. Premium or High Octane gas is likely to have more ethanol in the mix as adding ethanol (alcohol) will raise the Octane rating of gas. All higher Octane gas is harder to ignite and resists pre ignition a problem experience more often with high compression engines. High Compression engines require high octane premium gas too prevent ping caused by early ignition from the heat generated by the engines compression stroke and need High Octane rated gas (more difficult to ignite). The Octane rating is a scientific measure of the gas ability to resist pre ignition caused by compression.

Using premium gas is no guarantee of not getting ethanol in the gas.:bigoops: But premium gas has always been priced higher per gallon.:moneyeyes:

I don't know if it costs more to produce the more difficult to ignite premium but they have always charged more for it. In the early days of gas prodution they used more lead product to reduce ping and achieve a higher octane rating.
 

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Avoid the ethanol. I can send you the old gaskets from my 2004 Volusia if you want to see what ethanol does to them. Also note that if you go to a station with multiple grades of gas going to a single hose, there is generally three or four gallons of gas lef tin the tube from the previous fill-up. So if I pull in and use ethanol gas, then you come in and hit the 93 button, you get three or four gallons of ethanol gas before the 93 ever gets to the nozzle.

Oh and if you want to know what ethanol does to carburetors, it dries the gaskets and makes them hard, which causes leaks and other issues. This does not affect fuel-injected vehicles nearly the same.

*EDIT*

Also, lead was not used to reduce ping. Lead was used because of the materials used to make valve seals. It was a softer metal and the lead coating made them last. People who restore or operate older model tractors, such as the Ford 8N, will tell you this. Lead had nothing to do with ping or octane rating. It was about protecting the internal parts on the engine back in the day.
 

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Loudpipe....why would you even think about using that crap in your bike or any thing else you want to last. No offence......you must be a roukee!!!!1
A little bit of ethanol doesn't hurt anything. We have have vehicles at work that have over 500,000 miles with the original motor that, guess what, run off gas with ethanol. I am putting a motor in my car that has 398,000 miles. I am pretty sure that engine has seen plenty of e-10 go through it. So, are still going to tell me its crap?

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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1922: Lead was first introduce into gasoline, immediately drawing some concern for public health. The form of lead in gasoline was known as tetraethyl lead and it raised the octane level of gasoline, resulting in “premium” "Ethyl" gas for high-performance engines. Americans particularly males were in love with High-Performance engines so why worry about lead it didn't really hurt anyone.

The Urban Legend or Myth was lead was in gas to soften the blow valves experienced during normal operation. Most of America believed this misinformation cover up job by the gasoline lead adders. When the government stopped the use of lead in gas as a public health measure, For a while most everyone actually bought lead substitutes to add to lead free gasoline. After a few years those who weren't using lead substitutes experienced no valve problems with the older gas engines. And lead substitute additives are no longer regularly used by most to prevent the mythical valve failures.
 

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I don't know how it is in other parts of the country but where I live, you get ethanol in the premium gasoline, too. Believe me, I'd gladly pay the cost of premium if it meant I would actually get pure gasoline.

But that's not the case, so I decline to put higher grade gasoline in any machine that doesn't call for it. It would be wasting my money.

.
 

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I don't know how it is in other parts of the country but where I live, you get ethanol in the premium gasoline, too. Believe me, I'd gladly pay the cost of premium if it meant I would actually get pure gasoline.

But that's not the case, so I decline to put higher grade gasoline in any machine that doesn't call for it. It would be wasting my money.

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Same here and not only does the premium contain ethanol it's likely to be in at higher percentage.

Premium Gas or High Octane rating gas is likely to have more ethanol in the mix because adding ethanol (alcohol) raises the Octane rating of gas mixture. The ethanol costs less per gallon and the higher rated premium gas sells for more money a win win situation for the gas sellers adding ethanol. What would you do add alcohol to sell the gas for more money or not; according to government regulations you cannot have more than 10% Ethanol but who is really checking.:evil:
 

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This is Australian info, however, I doubt that Suzuki has different engines etc in the USA or anywhere else.

From the Suzuki website FAQ.

Is it possible to operate my Suzuki motorcycle using Ethanol Blended Fuels?

Warning: Suzuki Australia strongly recommends that you do not use fuels containing ethanol.

Please refer to the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries (FCAI) website FCAI & follow the links to the information regarding ethanol for further information with regards to operating Suzuki vehicles on commercially available fuels containing ethanol.

VEHICLE MODEL SUITABILITY FOR E5 OR E10 USE (FCAI)

The following table lists vehicle models suitability to run on E5 or E10 ethanol blended petrol. Before using E5 or E10 in motor vehicles not listed below, or if you are unsure, consult your handbook or manufacturer to check if the fuel is suitable.


MOTORCYCLES

BRAND / MODEL

Suzuki

All motorcycles and All Terrain Vehicles

E5 E10

x (Not Suitable..) x (Not Suitable..)
 

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This is Australian info, however, I doubt that Suzuki has different engines etc in the USA or anywhere else.

From the Suzuki website FAQ.

Is it possible to operate my Suzuki motorcycle using Ethanol Blended Fuels?

Warning: Suzuki Australia strongly recommends that you do not use fuels containing ethanol.

Please refer to the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries (FCAI) website FCAI & follow the links to the information regarding ethanol for further information with regards to operating Suzuki vehicles on commercially available fuels containing ethanol.

VEHICLE MODEL SUITABILITY FOR E5 OR E10 USE (FCAI)

The following table lists vehicle models suitability to run on E5 or E10 ethanol blended petrol. Before using E5 or E10 in motor vehicles not listed below, or if you are unsure, consult your handbook or manufacturer to check if the fuel is suitable.


MOTORCYCLES

BRAND / MODEL

Suzuki

All motorcycles and All Terrain Vehicles

E5 Suitable E10 Suitable

x x
So in reading your post it seems like all Suzuki motorcycles and all terrain vehicles are 5% and 10% suitable but Suzuki also doesn't recommend using Ethanol. Seems like they have all the bases covered not wanting to offend anyone. I am guessing when the E15 currently just in the planning or minimal deployment stages stateside becomes available in Australia Suzuki will say their vehicle is suitable but they don't recommend it.:biglaugh:
 

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So in reading your post it seems like all Suzuki motorcycles and all terrain vehicles are 5% and 10% suitable but Suzuki also doesn't recommend using Ethanol. Seems like they have all the bases covered not wanting to offend anyone. I am guessing when the E15 currently just in the planning or minimal deployment stages stateside becomes available in Australia Suzuki will say their vehicle is suitable but they don't recommend it.:biglaugh:
No, actually the XXXXX's means they are not suitable, formatting did not carry over very well...(Fixed)

Check the link...

Can my vehicle operate on Ethanol blend petrol? : FCAI

This is down the bottom of the page re Carb Vehicles.

Carburettor Equipped Engines

Vehicles made before 1986 vehicles were predominantly equipped with carburettors and steel fuel tanks.

The use of ethanol blended petrol in engines impacts the air/fuel ratio because of the additional oxygen molecules within the ethanol's chemical structure.

Vehicles with carburettor fuel systems may experience hot fuel handling concerns. This is because the vapour pressure of fuel with ethanol will be greater (if the base fuel is not chemically adjusted) and probability of vapour lock or hot restartability problems will be increased.

As a solvent, ethanol attacks both the metallic and rubber based fuels lines, and other fuel system components.

Ethanol also has an affinity to water that can result in corrosion of fuel tanks and fuel lines. Rust resulting from this corrosion can ultimately block the fuel supply rendering the engine inoperable. Water in the fuel system can also result in the engine hesitating and running roughly.
 
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