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Discussion Starter #1
Sorry for the series of dumb questions lately. When you change plugs is there any need for caution when pulling the caps off the old plugs so you can get the wrench on? I guess this fairly rigid plastic tube type thing going down into the recessed cavity is the cap. Do you just pull it of with a twist or what? Don't want to tear anything up.
 

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Just hold down as far as you can on the boot when you pull.. try to go smooth and not TUG them off of the plugs.. I would use caution when twisting or wiggling the boot back and forth.

If they are REALLY stuck.. get a pair of pliers wrapped with a shop rag for cushioning and try to ease them off.

Once you get them off, clean inside the boot with some 00 steel wool and a little terminal cleaner if there is any corrosion.
 

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The real way, which few owners ever do, is to remove the chrome head covers so that you can get at the plugs better and the plug wires.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the help guys. Time to get those Iridium plugs to work.
 

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I think you'll like the Iridium plugs. I've used them for about 12K miles in my M50 and they still look great and perform well.

Iridium is the most acid resistant metal known to man and acid formation is the reason for center electrode erosion. We're burning a sulphur based fuel and thus forming sulphuric acid in small amounts during combustion. This is the primary reason the center electrode becomes rounded in use, which makes it harder to form a spark. Sharp edges require lower voltages to make a spark jump from center to side electrode -- Iridium plugs keep the spark jumping for many more miles.

On a previous bike, a Kawasaki W650, I had 27K miles using Iridium plugs and they were still working well. On my M50 the edges of the center electrode were still quite sharp at 12K miles and not rounded off as a regular plug would be.

Ride well and far,

Ray Nielsen, in Minneapolis and going for a ride today.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
How easy is it to change plugs without removing the tank? I've heard something about sticking a 2 by 4 in there to support it without disconnecting. I'm not riding for a day or so and the tank is full. I could still remove it but was just wondering.
 

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1948man said:
How easy is it to change plugs without removing the tank? I've heard something about sticking a 2 by 4 in there to support it without disconnecting. I'm not riding for a day or so and the tank is full. I could still remove it but was just wondering.
It "can" be done.. but unless you want to take the chance of busting something, or scratching your tank trying to mess around.. I would say just pull the tank. When I need to remove a full tank I just siphon out the gas into a 5 gal gas can..

Just like removing the front fender without removing the wheel.. it "can" be done... but why wrestle with it.. IMHO
 

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I agree with Umple Z. Remove the tank. Tank removal is easier than handlebar grip replacement, headlight bulb replacement, shock absorber adjustment or battery replacement.
 
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