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Really? I have been on Suzuki crotch-rockets with over 50k on them that ran like beasts, and they were beat to death on each ride by their owners. I will be upset if this bike cannot handle that kind of mileage. My older Kawasakis and the old Rebel have mroe miles than the Volusia and they are great. I would expect the same out of Suzuki. Hell, even the older Harleys have loads of miles on them. Oh and don't get me started on the Indians, which vibrate like a jack-hammer!
 

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There has been a lot of talk about timing chain failure on the C 50 Boulevard engine. I find it hard to believe Suzuki built a motor and continues to build the same motor with a timing chain weakness considering todays advances in motor technology. Any well designed motor should be able to go 100,000 miles with proper maintenance today. So here is the question. has anyone ridden their C 50 motorcycle 100,000 and did you have to replace the timing chains and tensioners. And if you did have the Timing chain problem, how many miles were on your motorcycle. Please include the year so we can look for problem years.
Thank you for participating.
I just bought a 2007 C 50 Boulevard with 13,000 miles on the clock and want to know whether I can plan on riding it another 87,000 miles without a timing chain failure or whether I should sell it at 25,000 for something better designed. Thanks and hopefully we can get to the bottom of this timing chain issue
Past 150K, BUT that mileage does NOT include the 12k that was showing on the clock when my timing went wonky and caused the rear piston to meet the valves. Still on the original bottom end except for bearings and the front jug only got new chains, but the entire rear head, piston, con rod, bearings and jug were replaced. $2,600 parts and labor thankfully covered by the extended warranty

Other than a little more oil consumption than at 100k showing she still runs like a champ. I think like some of the VL800's other issues the timing issues are luck-of-the-draw.
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
57 k without cam chain problem, also 65 k before cam chain problem

This is great news; Facebook friends report these good facts about our C 50 motors:moneyeyes:

Lynda Desousa-Hudlin, I have 57,000 on my 2007 C50T---so far i have had no problems at all with anything!! And yes, that is not 100,000, but my thought is---if you still love the bike, and want to keep it, then you have to do the servicing!!!! I am planning on getting a new bike before I reach the 100,000 point, so for me I won't be doing the timing chain issue.

Sean Revels I have a 2005 C50 with 70,000 miles. I had to swap timing chain at about 65,000 (back in January of this year).
 

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What exactly is involved in changing the timing chain? Does the tensioner need changing? What's the big deal? My car will need the chains changed at about 180,000 miles. That's $2000 in work. Not too bad for a $50,000 plus car.
 

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There is no rhyme or reason as to why some bikes are dead-on reliable and others expire prematurely. I used to be in the 'it has to be a maintenance/riding style' camp. I treated my C50 like a baby. Did every maintenance item to the letter and used only top-shelf products. It didn't matter as it started burning oil and eventually self-destructed in just 4 short years. Others have nearly twice the miles I got and have never even cracked the engine to inspect their valves. It makes no sense..... So I can't tell you how your bike is going to fare long term. It all depends on what mood fate is in at the moment....
I agree, Ronnie and I rode the heck out of ours. We treated ours like dirt bikes, over desert, snow, mud. Only did the maintance that keep the bikes running. His was an 02, mine an 03. Both are still running and doing great. His has 65k. So I don't think it's just the maintenance/riding that's the sole factor for how long the motor lasts.
 

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What exactly is involved in changing the timing chain? Does the tensioner need changing? What's the big deal? My car will need the chains changed at about 180,000 miles. That's $2000 in work. Not too bad for a $50,000 plus car.
I haven't done the C50 but an engine is an engine.

If there is significant chain slap and the chain is the correct length, i.e. the timing marks etc all line up, then it is a tensioner and or guide issue which may need a strip down to replace. If the timing marks won't line up then the chain is stretched.

The chain should be able to be replaced with everything in situ, remove the cam gear and split the chain, attach new chain to the old one and hand turn the crank to feed it through the motor, remove old chain, reconnect new one, refit cam gear, reset tensioner, repeat.

PS. Could I do it myself?, yes. Would I do it myself these days?, probably not, but any good mechanic should be able to do it for a reasonable cost, dealers will charge you what the bike is worth.
 

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I'm just wondering about the details. If the jugs need pulling, then it's a big deal. I'd normally be honing and putting in new rings, and probably doing a valve job. That gets to be tiresome. If it's just dropping the engine, pulling some covers, and feeding through a new chain, then replacing the tensioner through some access system, that's not bad.
 

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I'm just wondering about the details. If the jugs need pulling, then it's a big deal. I'd normally be honing and putting in new rings, and probably doing a valve job. That gets to be tiresome. If it's just dropping the engine, pulling some covers, and feeding through a new chain, then replacing the tensioner through some access system, that's not bad.
Looks to me to be about as much fun as smacking yourself in the nuts with a ballpeen hammer. Doesn't look like you have to pull the heads, but, looks like you do need to pull the cams to get to the tensioners. Of course if the cam chains have a master clip or are splitable with a chain tool threading the new chains by connecting them to the old would be a lot less BS than pulling the covers and every componant that is in the way...the manual specifies pulling the engine out for the swap...If you can use the connecting the chains trick it would be tight but you could probably leave the engine in.
CLUTCH SIDE



GENERATOR SIDE

 

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Wellz, if you was careful you should be able to split it....maybe. Anyone here ever split one?
Same type of chain on the Honda's, old chain splits no problem, grinder and a pin punch.

When I've done it the replacement chain was too long and had to have links removed so it was an open chain.
 

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One of the other issues was releasing the tensioner so that you could get the cam chain back on the cam gear and bolted back onto the cam, you will never get it on under tension. The Honda had something that you could force the tensioner to a locked position and then release it when the new chain was on.

PS. The manual says to remove the cam gear and cam as part of the head removal so maybe there is enough play to get it on and off whilst under tension...
 

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If it's the second one were in trouble....(where'd the pics go..?)

Looks like the first one according to the manual. The second looks like the oil pump drive chain.

Deleted, a bit more digging revealed as we both expected that the other was the oil pump drive sprocket and chain. It was definitely the first. I pity the poor bastard that orders the second one (though why the heck somebody would install a used timing chain is beyond me!!!).
 

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I have personally seen 2 chains at about 50,000+/- miles and they were as loose as a retired hooker. There are plenty of cars out there that need their belts/chains replaced by recommended intervals at 50-60,000 miles. Just because nobody knows about it, doesn't do it and the car still runs, doesn't mean it's not recommended. Personally I don't see why on earth you wouldn't replace a consumable item as maintenance. Bike replace drive chains and sprockets all the Time. **** wears, why would that only affect some parts.


Personally I have an 04 that I bought in 08 with 2,000 miles. Since them I've put on over 50,000 miles. I beat it like a drag bike, load it down like a mule and corner it like a sport bike. Anybody who has ridden with me will tell you that I DO NOT baby my bike. Oil changes every 3,000 with rotella synthetic, engine ice for coolant, drive shaft lubed every or every other tire replacement. Spark plugs, carb cleaning and valve adjustment every spring when I start riding regardless of mileage. That way it's always clean and done and easy to remember when it was done. Right now if I had the money, I would take a weekend and replace the timing chain and tensioner And the oil pump chain, because $400 of maintenance on a bike that has given me 50,000+ miles with ZERO breakdowns (mechanically. Had a couple hickups, but never left me stranded, and got 1 nail in the tire which isn't the bikes fault. ) is cheap maintenance and will almost guarantee me another 50,000 miles.

To me.......its not even worth questioning.

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Every time I see the example of cars vs MC as it pertains to chains/belts, to me, it's apples to oranges.

Sure, a car will need to replace a chain or belt periodically in its lifetime, but the parts and labor is a fraction of what the car is worth. The bike, not so. From my understanding. The parts and labor can be $1k or more since when you pull it all down, might as well replace a few more things. That amount can be 25% of the bikes worth and could be up to 50%.

Mines market value is somewhere in the $3k to 3.5k. If it costs more than few hundred to replace the chain and tensioner, I'm not in for it. Don't have the tools or know how to be a DIY'er.
 
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I see your point, however yeah car costs more, but labor is labor. Just because the bike costs less doesn't mean all the parts just hang off the side for everybody to access. So then decision is up to each individual. On the flip side, if I take in a Chevy cavalier now that's only worth like $5,000 to get the whole timing replaced its still going to cost more than its worth in my opinion. But if you get rid of a vehicle every time it needs a larger repair or maintenance, you'll be going through a lot of vehicles.


However, since you are on this forum, there is a good chance you could get it done for cheaper and better than dealer work. For me the whole job will cost me about $400 and thats all parts. I do my own work. I would probably charge somebody $200-300 if i did the work. So its not to unreasonable to keep a bike in good condition if you ask me. I mean come on most of us spend up to half the vehicles value just in pipes, bags, seat and other add ons.

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I see your point, however yeah car costs more, but labor is labor. Just because the bike costs less doesn't mean all the parts just hang off the side for everybody to access. So then decision is up to each individual. On the flip side, if I take in a Chevy cavalier now that's only worth like $5,000 to get the whole timing replaced its still going to cost more than its worth in my opinion. But if you get rid of a vehicle every time it needs a larger repair or maintenance, you'll be going through a lot of vehicles.


However, since you are on this forum, there is a good chance you could get it done for cheaper and better than dealer work. For me the whole job will cost me about $400 and thats all parts. I do my own work. I would probably charge somebody $200-300 if i did the work. So its not to unreasonable to keep a bike in good condition if you ask me. I mean come on most of us spend up to half the vehicles value just in pipes, bags, seat and other add ons.

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I did not realize we owned the MC equivilant of a Chevy Cavalier? Lol... Hasn't that car been discontinued? Along with the Pinto, Vega
 
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Discussion Starter #38
150 on timing chain

My Chevy cavalier went past 150,000 miles with timing chain noise or replacement

I did not realize we owned the MC equivilant of a Chevy Cavalier? Lol... Hasn't that car been discontinued? Along with the Pinto, Vega
 

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I've said it before and I'll say it again. I have an 05 that turned 67,500 miles this year. In the 8 years I've ridden it the only thing I replaced were the clutch plates.
I did install a DJ back in 06. I do the normal maintenance myself including the valves.
Now it's over due for a cam chain tensioner according to the manual but the bike still runs like a clock. I talked to my local dealer who says the job runs about $1400.00 including his recommended new rings and re-seating the valves since he will already have the motor apart. That figures out to be $175 a year. If you consider that outragouse I have a set of kniting needles for sale you may be interested in.
 

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The manual has a suggested change interval for the timing chain?
 
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