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Discussion Starter #1
Yeah my oil is black and I changed my oil& filter before my last 15
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00 mile road trip. What should I do? Change or wait it out?
 

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You can suit yourself, but it is pretty typical for oil to get black before the normal change interval. I don't think you can change oil too often, but it can get expensive, particularly if you're using synthetic oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, I think I'll stick to the recommendation and I'm using non synthetic.
 

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I run synthetic in mine. I still change it as the manual suggests, but knowing that it takes a lot longer for this oil to break down from heat and shearing makes me feel better. Price difference is minimal.
 

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You cannot judge the condition of engine oil based on its color. When you "change" your oil, you are effectively draining out MOST of the old oil and filing with new. The fact is, there are passages and oil galleries in your engine and transmission (it is a shared bath lubrication system). that will not drain and it will cause old to mix with the new. As long as you use a motorcycle specific oil formulation in the correct viscosity, then you are going to be fine. Automotive oils have friction modifiers in them which will attach your wet clutch and cause it to slip. Dino or synthetic is irrelevant, given the extremely short service interval.
 

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Oil turns black...And it doesn't take long before it does. Don't sweat it.
Now if it turns white, then you have a problem.
Just keep an eye on your levels and oil/filter change intervals and you should be fine.
 

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Do you run higher octane gas? I have found in my bikes that said use 86, if I ran 91 for instance, it blacked the oil faster. Just my experience.
 

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Oil turns black...And it doesn't take long before it does. Don't sweat it.
Now if it turns white, then you have a problem.
Just keep an eye on your levels and oil/filter change intervals and you should be fine.
Don't know that I've ever seen white, but if it looks like chocolate milk you've got a real issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Do you run higher octane gas? I have found in my bikes that said use 86, if I ran 91 for instance, it blacked the oil faster. Just my experience.
I heard about this? Can anyone verify as to why if so? I believe the lowest octane available here is 91 and when non gasohol is available I'll run 95.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You cannot judge the condition of engine oil based on its color. When you "change" your oil, you are effectively draining out MOST of the old oil and filing with new. The fact is, there are passages and oil galleries in your engine and transmission (it is a shared bath lubrication system). that will not drain and it will cause old to mix with the new. As long as you use a motorcycle specific oil formulation in the correct viscosity, then you are going to be fine. Automotive oils have friction modifiers in them which will attach your wet clutch and cause it to slip. Dino or synthetic is irrelevant, given the extremely short service interval.
Dino or synthetic is irrelevant, given the extremely short service interval.
[/QUOTE]
What would qualify for short and long, in case I want to upgrade.lol
 

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You can't stretch the interval, just by changing the oil. Like I said earlier, the engine oil is a shared bath system. Meaning, it lubricates both the main engine components (upper and lower halves of the engine) plus the transmission. The constant mesh of the transmission gears cause molecular shearing which will break the oil down, regardless of what you use. The 10w40 that you put in yesterday comes out like a 5w15 in just 3000 miles. Synthetic base oils tend to protect better against molecular shearing that conventional oils, but not by much. The longer you run it, the thinner the viscosity gets. Use the recommended viscosity and change it at recommended intervals and you'll be fine. Save the fancy oil for cooking.
 

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what are the letters in the oil that rate it for a motorcycles? ,I cant remember but I think it was maybe sf, se, or sumthun like that
 

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Jaso MA or API SF/SG, SH, SH+SJ Anything else will contain friction modifiers and other additives which are not wet clutch compatible.
 

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For those who are bored and have money to spare, there are services that will analyze your used oil and give you a report on what they think your engine is doing.
 

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Yes, a Blackstone report. We had several members here use their service before. The results were pretty typical with most oil falling below recommended viscosity between 2500 and 3500 miles. The real surprise was the amount of suspended aluminum and iron from engine wear.
 
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