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Was hoping to get input on fuel since I have a gas station nearby that sells non-ethanol. Suzuki recommends 87 octane but the non-ethanol has an octane rating of 90. I know the non is better for the engines, injectors, etc. in general but was wondering if the higher octane would cause other problems. Would love to hear anyones input ! Thanks...
 

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Gas is Gas I generally buy from Costco as they have both high cleaning additive rating Top Tier rating and cheapest prices I use Regular in all my vehicles. Don't have any high performance vehicles requiring high Octane.

The marina where I keep my boat and the other gas station near the marina which use to show in the pure gas finder as ethanol free are no longer listed. I think it's because the vast majority of drivers in my area don't really look for ethanol free gas a real rarity. Consider yourself lucky you have a choice. My outboard motor on my sailboat is a modern 2005 Honda 9.9 so even with the marina no longer listed as ethanol free I don't expect a problem.

If I were you I would try what ever gas was handy including the high octane no ethanol. Don't be afraid to try one gas or another if your bike likes one kind use it when you can regular with Top Tier Rating for cleaner is my guess as being your best bet. I fill up my MCs at the local Ma and Pa Grocery/Beer/Lottery gas station a half block from my local Harley dealer where the Harley Dealer gases bikes loaded on his transport trailer and Lots of Harley riders gas before rides it sells 10% ethanol. I suspect a lot of the problems folks have is related to bad gas and or imagined problems. On trips, I like to use the gas pumps like Costco or major stations that sell a lot of product and likely get regularly get fresh fill ups.
 

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There are dozens of threads on this matter here. The facts are that ethanol will ruin rubber components, but will not harm brass and other metals unless it sits. It goes stale much quicker and due to phase separation, you can have issues if it does sit. On top of that, ethanol has much less power than gasoline, so you get less fuel economy (lower MPG). There is more, but you can read it on other threads here.
 

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It isn't the octane rating, it's the ethanol/alcohol content. You can still burn lower octane gasoline and preserve the engine and components better; ie: what it was designed for, OR you can fall for the higher octane "boost" ******** offered by ethanol and wear out said components. Do a little research. Check out alcohol fueled dragsters. Note the compressions required just to ignite and get some pressure out of these engines and how they have to be built in order to use this kind of fuel. 'Nuff said. ~ S ~
 

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Discussion Starter #11

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Was hoping to get input on fuel since I have a gas station nearby that sells non-ethanol. Suzuki recommends 87 octane but the non-ethanol has an octane rating of 90. I know the non is better for the engines, injectors, etc. in general but was wondering if the higher octane would cause other problems. Would love to hear anyones input ! Thanks...
If you raise corn you already know that ethanol fills not only tanks but the pockets of farmers, mechanics, politicians ect.

The facts, ethanol gas costs 10-15% less than the good stuff, but yields 6-12% less mpgs.
If you only leave it in your tank for two weeks it should not cause any problems. On a road trip it should be fine.
If it sits in your tank for more than 3 weeks problems will start to develop. $$

The good about ethanol. While engines emit more noise, farmers get quite. If you have a little water in your tank the ethanol will absorb it.

I'm very lucky, I have ethanol free gas 1.7 miles from my house and another station about 2 miles from work.

Wait until the snow melts and watch for "bike won't start" "bike won't run unless choke is partially out". Do a search now. The problems from ethanol speak loudly.

Now, those with "corn futures" will chime in about their wonderful snake oil"..

Ethanol Drawbacks - What are the Drawbacks of Using Ethanol?

 

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Not sure on American fuel, but in Canada my C50 loves the higher octane. I have one station that offers 94 because of a stock car track nearby. What I really like to avoid is the ethanol, which our high test doesn't have.
 

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Was hoping to get input on fuel since I have a gas station nearby that sells non-ethanol. Suzuki recommends 87 octane but the non-ethanol has an octane rating of 90. I know the non is better for the engines, injectors, etc. in general but was wondering if the higher octane would cause other problems. Would love to hear anyones input ! Thanks...
To answer your one and only question. The C50 Service Manual states:
Use only unleaded gasoline of at least 87 pump octane or 91 octane (R/2 + M/2) or higher rated by the Research Method.


Gasoline containing MTBE (Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether), less than 10% ethanol, or less than 5% methanol with appropriate cosolvents and corrosion inhibitor is permissible.

The above applies to the following Area Codes:E-03, 28, 33

Other Models
Gasoline used should be graded 91 octane or
higher. An unleaded gasoline is recommended.

COUNTRY AND AREA CODES
The following codes stand for the applicable country(-ies) and area(-s).
CODE COUNTRY or AREA
E-02 England (UK)
E-03 USA
E-19 EU
E-24 Australia
E-28 Canada

E-33 California

The only comment that I agree with is Two Red Ryders: "If I were you I would try what ever gas was handy including the high octane no ethanol. Don't be afraid to try one gas or another if your bike likes one kind use it when you can regular with Top Tier Rating for cleaner is my guess as being your best bet".

If the C50 Service Manual says it's OK, then see how it works for your Bike. Also check your fuel mileage for comparison.

Cheers.....
 

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Gas with 10% Ethanol If it contained no energy whatsoever could theoretically lower your MPG by 10%. But because it contains about 85% of the energy in the pure Gas mixture. With 10% of the gas mixture with 15% less energy or the Gallon of gas has 1.5% less energy likely to reduce mpg by 1.5%. If you get 45 mpg it might reduce your mpg to 44.8 MPG.
 

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Ethanol, also called ethyl alcohol, pure alcohol, grain alcohol, or drinking alcohol, is a pure substance CH3CH2OH, often abbreviated as C2H5OH or C2H6O and has a fixed energy content.

Gasoline on the other hand is comprised of more than 20 different compounds with varying energy content . Because it is mixed with different compounds for a winter blend which has 2% to 5% less energy but more volatile providing easier starts in cold weather than the summer blend. The maximum amount of volatility is limited by law with more volatile gas allowed in winter. The winter blend if used in summer would tend to evaporate into the air without being useful as a fuel and hence the government restriction on the use of winter blend in summer.

Using winter gas your mpg will be down 2% to 5% due to the reduced energy content of the pure gas mixture. If you get 45.0 mpg with summer gas expect 44.1 mpg to 42.7 mpg using the winter blend with reduced energy and more volatility.

Of course the those who dislike ethanol blame it for the lower MPG in winter but the 10% ethanol content is the same winter or summer and the energy content of ethanol is the same winter or summer. What varies is in winter the gas blenders can get away with adding more butane which is cheaper has less energy content but also more volatile so volatile that if used in summer at the same % as winter your gas would be evaporating into the air before you could burn it.
 
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