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Discussion Starter #1
My husband's 04 vl800 has a problem. back in Oct as he rode to work, the bike lost power then developed a ticking noise, yes, like the loud, angry sewing machine. So he parked it for the winter.Fast forward to the last weekends of Feb and first of March. Cool, read the forums, find out how to do the lifter adjustment. We, yes, we do the lifter adjustment perfectly, we're golden, right? change the oil, change the brake pads, new speed sensor, wash the bike. Prime it, crank it, and there's a loud tick low in the engine. I think it was always there myself since the bike acted up that day. But all my husband heard was the lifter tick. Bike has 48k on the odo. Both of us are at a loss about what to look at now, either way, the bike has to go to the shop, it's beyond our ability to tear into the engine beyond the lifter adjustment, both in tools and time. However I'd like thoughts about what might be wrong before I call a shop and get it towed in. I'm hoping we aren't in need of a new engine, but I'm afraid that will be the case.
 

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I don't think your giving us enough information. Is the bike now running and your hearing the ticking sound or are you referring to the sound your husband heard last fall?
Did you do the valve adjustment yourselves? What is your experience in doing valve adjustments? There are some little flukes that are inherent in the Volusia.

Be careful of husbands that want new bikes :biglaugh: Just saying.
 

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It is impossible to diagnose a sound that we cannot hear for ourselves....

When the bike died originally, did anyone check the oil level? Was the crankcase full, or was it low?

A loud tick in the bottom of the engine could be many things. Worn crankshaft bearings, worn or loose connecting rods, timing chain slap, etc. Unfortunately, the engine is not the most robust in the mid-size market and often needs mechanical attention right around the miles you currently have on it.... If you're absolutely sure that the valve adjustment was done correctly and that the sound is coming from the BOTTOM of the engine, I would only recommend taking to to a mechanic for a professional opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Oil was a bit low, he missed an oil change and as a fulltime college student on a double major AND fulltime job he gets forgetful. He did a class in small engine repair abt 20 yrs ago in HS so he remembers some lol. He double checked his work with a friend yesterday after he put everything back together and cranked, loud throaty tick in the bottom. Friend thought bent pushrod, but I'm told this engine doesn't have those. I don't care if he gets another bike, there's already an 87 Venture in the garage waiting to go. I just want my own bike :(
 

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Unfortunately, these engines have a history of using oil as they age and once they start, they don't stop..... If the engine is already using oil AND has a loud tick in the bottom, you're really better off just replacing the entire engine, rather than trying to repair it. Even if it is just the cam chain, the parts and labour will cost about $1000 to repair. And that would still leave you with an engine that is using oil as he rides. A complete overhaul can cost upwards of $2000 with parts and labour, unless you are willing to source all the parts yourself and he does the work in his spare time. From what you're saying, that isn't likely to happen.... A new, used engine is around $1000 with another $200-$400 to put it in. Unfortunately, neither solution is inexpensive.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
He was thinking of keeping the volusia for me to trike, as he got another bike in the 1100cc range for going to work, but we've learned triking it won't be a good idea loves the Venture, but really wanted to keep it as a roadtrip bike after restored. So we will likely part out the volusia soon.
 
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