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Whatever you do, don't rely on a Harley's GPS !
We were staring at a HD dealer to our right & Dave's HD gps kept saying "turn left" (and no you couldn't get there by turning left)
Therefore "I" get to be the navigator. Gonna push that thing in a river someday ! :D
 

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galaxy s7 is waterproof. dropped mine in a river...it swam and took pics of fish works just fine still after 2 years. I use it in the shower too for music.
I have a galaxy s7 from work, and it is water resistant. It barely, if ever, works with my Scorpion SGS MK II Gloves. My old iPhone 6s+ works better with same gloves, but I still have to touch the screen in a very specific manner when wearing gloves. I found that my Tour Master Cold-Tex 3.0 winter gloves work much better with iPhone than Scorpion, probably due to materials used (man-made vs. leather). IOs/Andriod interfaces have too many small elements to use comfortable when wearing motorcycle "touch screen able" gloves.

All that said, if one really needs a GPS for motorcycle, go for a brand name that makes motorcycle specific GPS. Out of all after-market navigation systems, Garmin has the best reviews. Before Apple Car Play/ Android Auto I used several different GPS units, and Garmin had the best interface and always worked. I did use Tom Tom units, but they had less intuitive interface. Garming/Tom-Tom units do come with a significant price tag, but there is nothing more frustrating (and at times very dangerous) than trying to handle a piece of poorly design electronics while riding a bike.
 

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A few other thing about Garmin that Tom Tom doesn't offer (at least last time I checked about six months ago): tire pressure sensors (there are some limitations on compatibility), synchronizing with Garmin action cameras for route recording and a bunch of small features that are mostly gimmicks unless you really need that and they become irreplaceable.
 

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for sure learning my lesson of buy once cry once. I have to stop buying cheap garbage. it dies or doesn't work then u still need it so you spend more for a brand name that works. learning slowly... :(
 

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I use good old fashioned map reading! I know most of you on this forum know what that is! Or look at gps just to get idea. Too hard to watch road, traffic and drivers who arent watching out for me!
 

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for sure learning my lesson of buy once cry once. I have to stop buying cheap garbage. it dies or doesn't work then u still need it so you spend more for a brand name that works. learning slowly... :(
It is normal to try and save a few $ on already expensive motorcycle gear and accessories, but in on the long run, it is not cost effective when taking into account your time, sweat and frustration.
I've changed 3 or 4 different USB chargers on my bike before I ended up with my current solutions. Aside from spending $10-$30 for each that stopped working, I had to wire these units, find a way to mount and water proof them, go through the hassle of taking the tank off and routing wires to the battery (or if you can, to AUX port in the headlight). Same story with saddlebags: I tried to repair saddlebags that came with the bike when I bought it, spend $50+ on McGyvering spare parts, only to hear from my wife that they look like sh&t cause they are old... Bought another set of inexpensive, but nice looking bags, spent a few days of mounting them to existing hardware: result stripped a fender mounting bolt and nut welded to the inner fender support. Spent more $ and a few more days on trying fix the issue and McGyver a support system for semi-rigid bags and coming-up with a way to lock them... all of that PITA for my nice looking (and inexpensive) bags started falling apart in 4 months after I've mounted them. Now I've spent even more $$$ on a set of higher quality bags (bought used from a forum member). All the money, effort and frustration out of trying to save a few $... Considering how much money and time I've spent, I could have bought a brand new set of high quality hard waterproof bags and have fun for the past year.

P.S. Motorcycling is not an inexpensive hobby, ready this: https://www.volusiariders.com/54-general-motorcycle-discussion/415330-true-cost-buying-used-motorcycle-motorcycling-hobby-used-c50-1st-bike.html
 

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Whatever you do, don't rely on a Harley's GPS !
We were staring at a HD dealer to our right & Dave's HD gps kept saying "turn left" (and no you couldn't get there by turning left)
Therefore "I" get to be the navigator. Gonna push that thing in a river someday ! :D
LOL.

True story: Ron and I are heading to Rolling Thunder back in May. His Harley has that new fangled "smart" GPS and we tried to use it in order to avoid the beltway rushhour traffic. Well, it had us going east on 395, then touring around Bethesda, before finally spitting us back on 495, going to wrong way.

I quickly took charge and using the power of Waze on my S10, got us going in the right direction again.

Ron is now forbidden to ever plan a ride again.
 

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The S10 is mounted to my handlebar with a RAM mount X mount and the rubber corner keeper. I keep it plugged in to a waterproof USB-C plug, so I can run the screen and bluetooth the directions to my intercom all day long.
 

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for sure learning my lesson of buy once cry once. I have to stop buying cheap garbage. it dies or doesn't work then u still need it so you spend more for a brand name that works. learning slowly...
It is normal to try and save a few $ on already expensive motorcycle gear and accessories, but in on the long run, it is not cost effective when taking into account your time, sweat and frustration.
I've changed 3 or 4 different USB chargers on my bike before I ended up with my current solutions. Aside from spending $10-$30 for each that stopped working, I had to wire these units, find a way to mount and water proof them, go through the hassle of taking the tank off and routing wires to the battery (or if you can, to AUX port in the headlight). Same story with saddlebags: I tried to repair saddlebags that came with the bike when I bought it, spend $50+ on McGyvering spare parts, only to hear from my wife that they look like sh&t cause they are old... Bought another set of inexpensive, but nice looking bags, spent a few days of mounting them to existing hardware: result stripped a fender mounting bolt and nut welded to the inner fender support. Spent more $ and a few more days on trying fix the issue and McGyver a support system for semi-rigid bags and coming-up with a way to lock them... all of that PITA for my nice looking (and inexpensive) bags started falling apart in 4 months after I've mounted them. Now I've spent even more $$$ on a set of higher quality bags (bought used from a forum member). All the money, effort and frustration out of trying to save a few $... Considering how much money and time I've spent, I could have bought a brand new set of high quality hard waterproof bags and have fun for the past year.

P.S. Motorcycling is not an inexpensive hobby, ready this: https://www.volusiariders.com/54-general-motorcycle-discussion/415330-true-cost-buying-used-motorcycle-motorcycling-hobby-used-c50-1st-bike.html
You're not alone.....but we are learning......right?
 

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Anyone know of apps available that will accept routes/planned trips?

That's the only reason I still use a gps...for the ability to plan a trip and import the routes to the unit.
 

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What are the benifits of CoPilot over Google maps/Waze?
I chose CoPilot several years ago after comparing several GPS apps. It's been a while so I don't really remember why I liked it better than Waze or any of the other apps I tried.

In a nutshell...

Pros: Google maps is fine, but...
Cons: It has a much higher dependence on being in an area where there is cellular service to work.

Pros: CoPilot doesn't need an active connection to work...All the maps are downloaded to the phone. It'll work fine when there is no service available. I also found it relatively simple to use.
Cons: it's POI search feature used to be powered by Google. A few years ago they switched to Yelp! Yelp! couldn't find it's own arse with both hands in its pants. Many CoPilot users are hoping that they'll go back to Google.

To be fair, Garmin's POI database is nothing to cheer about either and it's search function is painfully slow.

For me, I still prefer a dedicated GPS, but between my Garmin, my Copilot app, and Google Maps, one or the other gets me where I want to be. They're not mutually exclusive.

Also a warning. They can all screw up from time to time. That's why I like having multiple options.

Regarding paper maps...
I can use them. I can read a compass and topo maps, etc. too. But a paper map won't tell you where you are if you're lost. It won't tell you where the nearest gas station, police dept, etc. is. It's still wise to carry one, and I do.
But spending time, hundreds of miles from home, at night, on the roadside, lost, in a rainstorm, with a wet map on my lap and a flashlight in my teeth, the ability to orient myself with a map and compass loses it's shine.

Fun times like that are what prompted me to buy a GPS in the first place.

I got stories. 🙂
 

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Pros: Google maps is fine, but...
Cons: It has a much higher dependence on being in an area where there is cellular service to work.
You can download the maps to your phone now. There are still a lot of limitations when it's offline though, so your point still stands, just wanted to make sure that was clear.
Regarding paper maps...
I can use them. I can read a compass and topo maps, etc. too. But a paper map won't tell you where you are if you're lost. It won't tell you where the nearest gas station, police dept, etc. is. It's still wise to carry one, and I do.
But spending time, hundreds of miles from home, at night, on the roadside, lost, in a rainstorm, with a wet map on my lap and a flashlight in my teeth, the ability to orient myself with a map and compass loses it's shine.

Fun times like that are what prompted me to buy a GPS in the first place.

I got stories. 🙂
I couldn't possibly agree with this one more. Paper maps are important to have because they don't run out of batteries or require cellular or GPS signals to work, but the best place for them is in a ziplock bag at the bottom of my saddlebag.
 
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