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I've been riding for about 3 years, mainly every day to and from work with the occasional trip to the mountains. I feel competant , but wouldn't say I'm particularly good or improving.
I was thinking or taking some additional courses offered at the msf or maybe an intro Track day, but I'm not sure the best way to go about learning.
What has helped you improve to where you are today?
 

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Track days and more training could be good. I'd say that going to the local school parking lot during off hours and practicing slow speed maneuvers was probably the best thing I did to build up my confidence and skills.
 

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I live on a dead end road so there isn’t much traffic. I was riding an 02 Volusia for 6-7 years and last March bought a C50. The clutch lever is a lot lighter and throttle more responsive on the C50. I grab a bunch of pop cans from my receive bin and placed them at 20’ intervals down the centre of my road and practiced weaving around them. As I got better I would move them closer. I also practiced doing figure 8s around them. Really help me get the feel of the clutch and throttle and built my confidence. On the second day of my practicing some neighborhood kids came out with their bicycles to practice with me. Was a fun time.
 

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I'll second the MSF course.
You'll need to be taught things you didn't know that you didn't know.
 

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MSF teaches you mostly best practices and slow speed riding skills. Both are important, and even lifesaving. Once you take MSF level 1 and 2, and feel comfortable while practicing yourself, I would recommend learning higher speed riding. Just note that C50/90 and predecessors are not necessarily well equipped for a brisk "high G" ride in the mountains.

Best practice for me is riding with a more experienced/better rider than yourself and/or in a very small group of more experienced riders. I watched and learned what others did on different bikes, understood the capabilities and limits of my '08 C50 much better, and had a lot of fun in the process. Just take it slow at first.
 

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Take all the motorcycle traing classes you can. Practice all you can. But, the number one way to become a better rider is.....crashing.
(Notice I said number one way, not best way)

Sent from my SM-T580 using Tapatalk
 

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I've been riding for about 3 years, mainly every day to and from work with the occasional trip to the mountains. I feel competant , but wouldn't say I'm particularly good or improving.
I was thinking or taking some additional courses offered at the msf or maybe an intro Track day, but I'm not sure the best way to go about learning.
What has helped you improve to where you are today?
YouTube has two people I like to watch and then practice... "Ride like a Pro" by a game named Jerry and also "MC Rider"
 

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Ride Like A Pro of a great video series, and MC Rider always has excellent advice. I'll second those recommendations.
 

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Here in Virginia taking the MSF gets you your MC2 designation on your license, nothing additional is required. It also gets you a discount on your car insurance as well. A safety course is a safety course.
But, there's also an advanced course that's taught on your own bike and it's a lot different doing the figure 8 on my M50 than it was on the little rebel 200 that the initial course is taught in.
And I'll throw a vote in for MCRider on YouTube as well. He puts out a lot of solid information.
 

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All the above stated.

Practice emergency braking, swerves at different speeds, decelerate, downshift, quickly upshift and accelerate (in case you ever encounter a dog chasing you), making u-turns. Anything real world you can think of and any scenario that may happen.
I do it in parking lots on empty streets, etc.
Any low speed maneuvers will make you a better more confident rider, plus it is about 85% of most people’s riding. If you look around any parking lot or heavy stop and go traffic situation and you will be able to quickly determine who has actual riding skills and who will panic in an emergency situation.
 
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