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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,
Hopefully I'm not here under false pretences, I ride a German built bike called a Sachs Roadster 800 which shares the same engine and final drive as the Volusia and so ideally I can refer to your engine section forum and again hopefully maybe even contribute although I'm far from expert. This is the first vee twin that Ive owned and also the first shaft drive and I love the bikes torque and engine braking. I'll try to attach photo below if anyone is curious about the Sachs.
Tire Fuel tank Wheel Plant Automotive lighting
 

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Welcome from Kennesaw GA!

Never heard of the bike, but it looks pretty cool. Hopefully we can help you out a bit.
 

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Welcome, new member!

Thank you for the information about and photo of the Sachs bike. I've not seen or heard of it before. I like its looks very much.
 

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Welcome from Florida, USA :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Many thanks for the welcomes, I wasn't too sure with it not being a Volusia that I'd be allowed in. DCinCT, I've had the bike for a couple of years now and have never seen another one on UK roads although generally every riding summer there are about 15 registered for road use in Great Britain. In answer to your question it reminds me of bikes from my youth in the 70's ie just a straightforward bike like they used to be ie, not a sports tourer or sports bike, hyermoto etc etc, no electronics or ABS [ they were only made from 2000 to 2004 and I've read that there were less than 1,000 built at the Nuremburg factory before Sachs went bust ] it's very light, the suspension is very taut so the bike handles well and is very flickable, in fact I fitted Hagons to mine as the handling was that bit too Italian for comfort, the carb internals differ from stock Suzuki but I don't know how that translates in performance difference from stock if at all, probably like your Volusia the ride is more about the torque. The front brakes are excellent, I had sintered pads on mine but swapped them out for organics for extended disc life without too much decrease in stopping power. When the bike was released over here the motorcycling press were unimpressed generally commenting that the bike had an identity crisis whatever that means and was overpriced but to me it's a straightforward motorcycle with top quality components such as Marzochhi forks, Grimeca brakes and an Egli designed frame, which is comfortable, rides and stops well and has the benefit of a dependable power unit which produces more than enough power for me at least. I am lucky enough to own a couple of other bikes, one of which is a Triumph America cruiser so I certainly do understand the appeal of the Volusia but the Sachs is my favourite of the three I think partly because it's such an odd, rare [ though not valuable ] bike and partly because to me it's how I recall bikes from my youth and also partly because of its looks and practicality. Reading back the above I can see that I'd never have made the ranks of motorcycling journalism but hopefully you can get the gist and thanks for your interest.
 

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Yesterday I hit the internet search engines and researched your bike, Born To Be Mild. As I mentioned, it was a new make and model to me.

The moto-press was rather dismissive of your Sachs Roadster, wasn't it? Goes to show that motorbikes opinions are quite subjective.

I'm glad your bike makes you happy. My last bike, a Honda CTX700N, was also belittled by the moto-press ... and it was the best all-arounder I have ever owned.

Here in the 'States, it seems that if the moto-press can't drag a knee while making a bike fly up a canyon road in California, the machine is deemed mediocre, and hence unacceptable. And don't get me started on the 34-inch seat heights that are so commonplace now, as though everyone who wants to ride a bike is presumed to be at least 6 feet tall.

Personally, I live on the other side of the continent from California, and I rarely drag a peg let alone a knee. I value road manners more than sporty performance. And even with platform soles on my boots I'll never reach 6 feet tall, so the entire ADV-bike fad can go to blazes for all of me.

Looking at the photos of your Roadster, my immediate thought is, "Yes, I'd ride that!"
 

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well written "Mr Mild"...it works for you and thats all tha t really matters...sounds like a fun machine to throw around and like the upgrades you've made, not that I'm tech savy on such things...your post reminds me alot of reading one of our members here...Mr.E...enjoy the mc and ride safe out there.
 

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I wasn't too sure with it not being a Volusia that I'd be allowed in.
No worries. Most of us have long since moved on from our Suzukis. All are welcome. The only issue with it being being a VL800 is that we may struggle with helping on issues. Hopefully you don't have many though.
 

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Welcome and congrats on a very cool bike.
We bought a new 2002 Suzuki Marauder 800 for my wife's first bike. It reminds me of yours without the high tech components. That Suzuki motor on a smallish bike is a ton of fun. I'd take it out for quick rides round the valley leaving the much heavier C90 in the garage. She sold that bike years ago, now I have a Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 for those quick rides and ☕
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you one and all for your warm welcomes and very kind messages. I'm not much of a soccer fan but as I type this America is giving England a proper run for their money at the World Cup, anyway, I digress, your comments above are all much appreciated.
 
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