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Discussion Starter #1
i 3D printed a cruise control and tried it for the first time today. If I let go of the handlebar for more than a second (yeah, I know stupid idea), the handlebar shakes and I can feel the front wheel shimmy from side to side.

honestly never noticed this before and when I am riding normally, I don’t feel any shaking at all so this kind of surprised me.

i am going to check tire pressure in the morning. Pretty sure both front and back are low.

Other than that, what should I be looking for?
 

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Could be a number of things, low tires as you said, maybe tires worn out or worn incorrectly from low pressure.
I had a bike that presented problems when the spokes became generally loose.
I don't think your cruise control has anything to do with it.
I'm sure some other folks will chime in with more stuff, but I'm putting my money on the tires for now.
 

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I take my hands off of the bars all the time, you won't hear me telling you that it's stupid.

I agree on the air pressure, that's the #1 suspicion I have. If the pressure is too low and you add pressure but the shimmy continues, you may have already worn the tires irregularly from running with low pressure. If it isn't wobbling with your hands on the bars, I'd just keep my hands on them and wear out the set I have before replacing them. Tire's ain't cheap, but I am.

The other things I can think of are either a bad bearing in the front axle or in the steering head.
 

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My Nomad used to do that as my tires wore. I think they got cupped and then would track the road differently. I replaced the steering head bearings, and kept them just a bit tighter and that helped afterwards. On that bike, if I had the bike on the lift and pushed the bars slightly and left go, the bars would turn all the way to the stop and then bounce. If I kept the stem bearing tight enough to stay wherever I had the bars turned, without them just dropping to full lock, it virtually eliminated any shake when riding down the road. My last set of tires were Dunlop Elite 4, and they were the best handling I had on that bike. I only put about 5,000 miles on them before selling the bike though, so I can't say what the long term result was. Long way of saying, it is most likely the tires, and may also be the steering head bearings. Each can have an effect, and if both are bad, it compounds the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So tire pressure was fine. I did notice last year that the rear tire was low enough that the bike wanted to ride tar snakes more than I would have thought reasonable.

can rear tire be the issue?
 

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Every time that has happened on my 05C90 it's the front tire cupping. That on a Michelin Commander II. Tread looked perfect but you could feel the bumps on your hand and when you pushed it by hand, it went bump, bump, bump. Even when I brought it in to get changed the guy said there is sure a lot of tread here. He asked why I was changing it. About 12000 miles and 40 lbs.
Jim
05C90
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Every time that has happened on my 05C90 it's the front tire cupping. That on a Michelin Commander II. Tread looked perfect but you could feel the bumps on your hand and when you pushed it by hand, it went bump, bump, bump. Even when I brought it in to get changed the guy said there is sure a lot of tread here. He asked why I was changing it. About 12000 miles and 40 lbs.
Jim
05C90
good info Jagabom. I’ll go over the tire more carefully,
 

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I'm sure you'll get the issue resolved eventually, when one of the suggestions matches your particular case. Before you do though, look into something called "Tank Slapper" or "Death Wobble": it is when either handlebars (front wheel) or the whole bike (rear wheel) oscillates rapidly left to right. If you have not seen it yet: youtube has plenty of videos, including cruisers. It can be deadly! There are many different causes of death wobble, including road surface irregularities, worn/defective/low pressure tires or tires with foreign material (aka nails) embedded into thread, front/rear suspension problems, bike geometry, bent frame, wheel alignment, lose/tight bearings, etc. etc. etc.

Be very careful with handlebars shaking! I wouldn't even ride the bike faster than 5-10 MPH until this is resolved (if at all). Normally, if you let go of the handlebars, bike should just goes straight, given you are riding a straight, flat, smooth road, enough speed, etc. Wheels are gyroscopes, and bike tends to ride in a straight line if you let it. I don't think that there is a sure way to stop death wobble once it occurs on a ride. You might get lucky, and it stops on its own, or you might be able to slow it down by placing your palms over handlebars (front wheel), engine braking (rear wheel) or it could get worse if your body mass starts resonating on the same wave as death wobble.

Enough said, just be careful with it.
 

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tire wheel weights fell off?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm sure you'll get the issue resolved eventually, when one of the suggestions matches your particular case. Before you do though, look into something called "Tank Slapper" or "Death Wobble": it is when either handlebars (front wheel) or the whole bike (rear wheel) oscillates rapidly left to right. If you have not seen it yet: youtube has plenty of videos, including cruisers. It can be deadly! There are many different causes of death wobble, including road surface irregularities, worn/defective/low pressure tires or tires with foreign material (aka nails) embedded into thread, front/rear suspension problems, bike geometry, bent frame, wheel alignment, lose/tight bearings, etc. etc. etc.

Be very careful with handlebars shaking! I wouldn't even ride the bike faster than 5-10 MPH until this is resolved (if at all). Normally, if you let go of the handlebars, bike should just goes straight, given you are riding a straight, flat, smooth road, enough speed, etc. Wheels are gyroscopes, and bike tends to ride in a straight line if you let it. I don't think that there is a sure way to stop death wobble once it occurs on a ride. You might get lucky, and it stops on its own, or you might be able to slow it down by placing your palms over handlebars (front wheel), engine braking (rear wheel) or it could get worse if your body mass starts resonating on the same wave as death wobble.

Enough said, just be careful with it.
I know about death wobble. Thanks. I will be careful.
 

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Had this problem, slight vibration pull to one side and wobble hands free, turned out to be a fork alignment, easy to do and can find a lot of methods on youtube. Something to try especially if you have hit potholes, gone up curbs or just have never done one.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Had this problem, slight vibration pull to one side and wobble hands free, turned out to be a fork alignment, easy to do and can find a lot of methods on youtube. Something to try especially if you have hit potholes, gone up curbs or just have never done one.
good thought. I’ll look in to a fork alignment,

‘My tires seem to be ok. So this might help.

i noticed today that on some roads, no wobble at all while on others the normal wobble. only feel wobble if on cruise control and hands off the handlebars.
 

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8/10 times these random front end shakes are caused by tires. It's tough to evaluate them just by looking, as mentioned sometimes you can feel some irregular wear or cupping, but I've also had bikes that would shake, tires "looked fine", and a new front tire immediately cured the issue.

The other common issue of shakes is loose/worn steering head bearings. This is relatively easy to check with the "bounce check". Lift the front wheel of the bike off the ground. Center the handlebars, and give them a little shove to one side or the other. Ideally, they will fall over, hit the stop, and stay. If they rebound off the stop at all, they're probably too loose. If they don't fall all the way over without a push, possibly too tight (sometimes cables/wiring/ect can interfere in one direction or the other though).

Too loose usually manifests as shimmies/wobbles, particularly at higher speeds or going over bumps. Too tight gives an odd, wandering feeling at lower speeds, like the bike needs constant correction to hold a straight line.

Wheel balance shows up as an up/down "hop" that predictably gets worse with more speed. Tires or loose bearings are a side-to-side shake, distinct from the up-down vibration from potentially losing a wheel weight (and that usually is only at faster highway speeds unless your tires needed a ton of weight to balance- tires now are generally good enough balancing is frequently not needed, particularly for cruisers with relatively modest top speeds).
 

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Discussion Starter #16
8/10 times these random front end shakes are caused by tires. It's tough to evaluate them just by looking, as mentioned sometimes you can feel some irregular wear or cupping, but I've also had bikes that would shake, tires "looked fine", and a new front tire immediately cured the issue.

The other common issue of shakes is loose/worn steering head bearings. This is relatively easy to check with the "bounce check". Lift the front wheel of the bike off the ground. Center the handlebars, and give them a little shove to one side or the other. Ideally, they will fall over, hit the stop, and stay. If they rebound off the stop at all, they're probably too loose. If they don't fall all the way over without a push, possibly too tight (sometimes cables/wiring/ect can interfere in one direction or the other though).

Too loose usually manifests as shimmies/wobbles, particularly at higher speeds or going over bumps. Too tight gives an odd, wandering feeling at lower speeds, like the bike needs constant correction to hold a straight line.

Wheel balance shows up as an up/down "hop" that predictably gets worse with more speed. Tires or loose bearings are a side-to-side shake, distinct from the up-down vibration from potentially losing a wheel weight (and that usually is only at faster highway speeds unless your tires needed a ton of weight to balance- tires now are generally good enough balancing is frequently not needed, particularly for cruisers with relatively modest top speeds).
Thanks for that. I had a good look at the front tire today. It looks perfectly fine. Pressure is ok if a bit high 35psi when I think front wheel for vl800 is supposed to be 30. I don’t have a centre stand or bike lift so was not able to get the front wheel off of the ground will do that when I can get to somewhere that I can do a redneck bike lift.
 
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