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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, doing a few things to my wifes bike and looking for input from anyone whos done this stuff more than me.

First thing, Im taking her naked. Installed Gmans block offs already. Uni filters are in hand waiting for the the carb to be done. Ordered a rebuild kit and a rejet kit. Rejet kit has 137.5 main, which Ive installed, and an optional 142.5, and 32.5 pilot. Also installed one shim. Carbs been disassembled and cleaned.

It seems like the bike has always run rich. Since we got it the end of the exhaust is black and when riding behind her the smell is awful. Took the plugs out, they are dry, but also dark. The ring around the baffles of her exhaust were drilled out with a hundred holes, there is literally no room for more drilling, thought about just removing them. With all of this being said, should I be jetting this to run even richer? I figured with her exhaust like it is, it would be lean?

Im looking for a good starting spot I guess since Ive never messed with rejetting etc, done plenty of cleanings tho. The exhaust sounded good with the pair valve and stock airbox, just smelled so bad.

So where would you start? Should I leave main and pilot jets stock and see if it leans out a bit, somehow? Although this makes no sense in my head except Ill be adding to more air to a rich condition.

Or should I just put in the 132.5 main and 32.5 pilot with one shim? 2 shims? Ugh, how do you guys do this all the time lol
 

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Howdy hardway,
There is a general set of rules regarding upping jets, main jets specifically. Assuming stock jetting, you would only up the main jets to suit a change that adds more or faster airflow into the carburettor.
usually this is aftermarket free flowing exhaust pipes, and free flowing air filter. In each case, the general rule is go up two jet sizes on mains. Two sizes for big exhaust, two sizes for high flow air filter.

Having established that, there is a general condition for the volusia that needs to be understood. First, they come fairly lean from factory.
Secondly, they have a habit of egging out the needle jet, which provides for an overly rich condition through the range.

Main jets only really work above 3/4 throttle. If you are seeing rich deposits then it’s time to inspect the needle jets for egged holes. That is a whole other issue, right there. If you live in the USA it’s an easy fix. So check this before changing pilot or main jets, or needles and needle settings.
 

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I’ve been working on my 98 Volusia carbs for months, which were in shocking conditio. But setting things right became difficult due to the egged out needle jet holes. No matter what other adjustments you make to air/fuel screw, pilots, mains, needle position, etc, it will not cure the excess fuel entering from the damaged needle jets.
my bike improved economy and across the board from when I got it, but, over time, the bike became dangerous to ride due to holding throttle after let off, and slow but steady degrading of the performance.
Check this issue first before messing with jetting kits. Because the warning signs are a Volusia with factory set up showing rich conditions. They come lean out of the box. Your drilled baffles should add leanness, not richness.
I hope that makes some sense.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It turned out that my air/fuel screw was only out a little over 1 turn once I pulled the plug. Used the 137 main, 2.5 turns out, and it runs great now. Thanks for your advice!
 
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