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Aye carumba!......that's funny........who would've ever thought..........BMW?
 

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A couple of zip ties and you' re back on the road.... Just think, changing that whole mess is cheaper than a new belt or a chain. Still, after all the internet nonsense, its the pick of most long distance riders... And me.
 

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Kinda feel sorry for this guy then...

Same drive shaft as on my NineT so pretty scary.

The thing about BMWs is that their maintenance intervals are not suggestions! If they say change out your rear gear oil every year they mean it! Some owners think that the dealership is simply trying to nickel and dime them. I'll pay the $260 once a year to change out all of the of washers, flush brakes, change out gear oil, and the collection of other items that they check, flush, or change. I tend to feel that my Japanese bikes are not as over engineered and there is more leeway for fluff. Failing that, the parts/bikes are cheaper.
 

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Actually, Mad, worry not. i have 500,000 miles on their shaft drive bikes with no issues, and that includes some very hard use.

I actually know the owner of this bike. The boot caught on fire and the rear brake dragging may have caught the boot on fire. The bike actually never stopped working (how tough is that). Fixed and back on the road in 36 hours! Free.

This is actually most likely not a final drive failure, especially since the drive never quit. Itdidnhave to be replaced because of the damage from the burned boot.

The real question is what kind of customizations are on your nine- t. I'm a fan.
 

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Thanks!

Lots of little things but the big stuff is:
ABM clipons
Akra Headers
Corbin seat
Rizoma screen (I have a Wonderlich fairing that I'm installing tonight)
Carbon Fiber mud guard
Bar end mirrors
etc...

I have plenty of GS buddies--one who literally rode around the world--twice (he actually recently died riding that dangerous highway in India) and never heard a complaint about the rear shaft.
 

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I am a member of two owners clubs, big ones. In ten years I have seen two fails. One was a guy with a GS.. He weighed 359 pounds and loaded the bike with enough stuff to build a hotel. The other was my friend who puked a final drive at 115000 miles. I think it was a 350 dollar repair. Big whoop.
 

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Things break and when they do it usually not cheap. I work as a non destructive inspector for helicopters and we see drive shafts for engines with tiny stress cracks in the splines but this is only seen at interval inspections and there is no guarantees you catch it before it fails all you can do is preventative maintenance


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Is there a role for a destructive inspector? I really am curious? i may be the man for the job. After I worked on a helicopter, noone would ever prudently get in it :)
 

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Is there a role for a destructive inspector? I really am curious? i may be the man for the job. After I worked on a helicopter, noone would ever prudently get in it :)

Haha yeah I know what you mean. We do a lot of inspections on parts that come off the helicopter and sometimes when they rebuild them we inspect housings for landing gear and hydraulic stuff and engine parts etc. But as far as the hourly inspection we usually do things like ultrasonic inspections on the blades and stress points of the airframe just to ensure integrity and make sure tiny fractures are not forming in the metal that are not seen by the naked eye. Anyways I'm getting off topic that's why I believe and know for a fact things will break over time and unless you got fancy equipment unless your lucky you won't catch it until it finally gives out.


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Hi all from down under
I have a 93 vs 1400 with 85,000 km. Great bike but blew a umi joint a couple of weeks ago. In tech speak a catastrophic failure. Bits of uni everywhere. found the drive shaft inspection plate cover back up the highway. Splines reasonably well lubed although grease looked very old. I put it down to " things that go bump in the night" . Anyone else got any ideas.

Have a new OEM uni coming from Megazip Japan so will be all good again soon.
 

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Is greasing the ultimate solution - or is the missing grease not the main cause at all?

I recently did some research on a 2002-2006 Rang Rover III (L322). Interestingly, I found out that this particular Range Rover seems from 2002 to 2005 has serious issues with the shaft drive, particularly on the front end side coming out of the differential.

These 2 links might be interesting:
Front Differential Failure (Range Rover Mk III)
Front Differential Recall (Range Rover Mk III)

The first link shows the old setup that's known to cause issues. Now, to me it looks very similar to the setup our C50 uses on the rear end of the shaft drive. The thing in common is the kind of fixed, non flexible coupling at the rear end of our driveshafts. (Front end of the Range Rover III)

This leads me to think that the missing grease isn't the main cause of the driveshaft problem, it might contribute to an slightly earlier failure, but possibly it's not the main issue. Unfortunately that would also mean that greasing isn't the ultimate solution....

I'm not a mechanic or engineer, but the C50 driveshaft just came to my mind whilst researching on the Range Rover and the common driveshaft issue found on the Range Rover reminded me on the failures of some of the C50 driveshaft failures.

Another driveshaft motorcycle comes to my mind, the BMW GS series - everyone of those I have seen appear to have an flexible rear end coupling - unlike our C50's.

The Range Rover article also mentions misalignment - I think about suspension settings on our C50. The rear shock comes set on factory setting 4, the range is 1 to 7. I want my suspension softer than on setting 4 since I get some heavy shocks in my back when driving over potholes. Now my thinking was that possibly setting 1 (softest) in comparison to setting 7 (hardest) would allow much more up and down movement of the driveshaft and therefore more or less wear - If I think correctly.

edit: I think I'm on the wrong train with the suspension setting, since the rear end of the shaft is attached to the wheel - so more up and down movement would only affect the engine side connection...


What do you think?
 

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My 2011 vl800 is in the shop with spines all chewed up. Mech. Says he has never seen this before. Is there a special Greece that needs to be used?
 

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I'd replace the entire rear drive & driveshaft with an upgrade drive unit & shaft, lube it well with a moly paste formulation, prior to installation.
Consider the difference between the current final ratio, 3:63-1, versus 3:02-1, which causes the machine to feel as though it has attained 6th gear.
There's almost always someone selling upgrade rear drives in the SWAP MEET section of this forum.

If the cost of an upgrade drive eludes You, look for a standard VL800 drive, either here, or on ebay.
 
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