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Crossing water on this bike was probably not the best idea, but I had no choice if I wanted to get home last night. So have any of you done it and what was the result?

Back story: so I had to cross a few of the flooded roads yesterday night. Sewer drains we’re back feeding water onto the streets in a coastal area of Far Rockaway NY. No rain, but there was a lot of water on the streets. Wonder how it works, tidal waves and wind?

I think it was about 3-5 in of water, but with cars moving, waves might have been higher. I didn’t turn off the bike for about 30 minutes after I had to cross water, highway and street ride was fine afterwards, and bike started just fine after fill-up at my gas station. I managed to keep mostly dry, but 50 degree weather with wind chill is no joke with wet boots and pants.

Bike is covered in white (salt?) deposits where water splashed, especially on parts that were hot. I probably have to wash off the salt deposits from the bike asap.

Motorcycle riding is always an experience. I doubt I would even think about the flooded streets if I were driving in my SUV. I just hope there is no damage to electronics...
 

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Are they dumping salt on the roads already out there? Ugh. I went on a pleasant cool ride Monday. It has been snowing all day today in MN... I honestly think your bike will be just fine! If there is salt on it, rinse off asap and carry on.
 

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Are they dumping salt on the roads already out there? Ugh. I went on a pleasant cool ride Monday. It has been snowing all day today in MN... I honestly think your bike will be just fine! If there is salt on it, rinse off asap and carry on.
I think it was sea water back feeding through storm drains.
Washing the bike now. It started just fine, rode to a car wash just fine, waiting for it to cool down before a bath ?
 

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A number of years back, my wife and I rode out bikes down to the South Hills for a "bike night" at Quaker Steak and Lube. On the way there, we saw the storm clouds gathering and when we got to the restaurant, the heavens opened up and it poured for more than an hour. No big deal, right? We were inside, enjoyed our dinner and entertained the kids while we waited for it to pass. We tried to go home around 2100, well after the storm had passed, but were prevented from doing so because Sawmill Run Blvd (Rt51) was closed due to flooding. We took a few detours, one of which included a flooded section of Banksville Rd (Rt19) that was so deep that the water came up over my floorboards and submerged my bottom pipe.

A few years later, we were riding the Blue Ridge Parkway and we got caught in another storm up on the mountain. The roadway flooded and I had to ride through much deeper water than previously experienced. Both times, the bike suffered from electrical gremlins shortly thereafter (FI light and other diagnostic codes), but they went away once things dried out.

It is all part of the thrill and joy of riding a motorcycle. You can't avoid it, so you might as well get used to it.
 

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Man riding on flooded roads is really risky. You don't know how strong the current is at the deepest point or if the flooding has eaten part of the road. Recipe for disaster.
 

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3-5 inches is no big deal, as long as you don't find a hole while riding though. You're usually fine as long as the air intake doesn't submerge. Keep the revs up do water doesn't go into the exhaust. The electronics may freak out, but as mentioned, they'll usually go back to normal once things dry out.

I've never done it on a bike, but I've been up to the windows in trucks and no issues. It's not ideal and not something I would want to do by choice, but sometimes you've gotta do what you've gotta do.
 

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Man riding on flooded roads is really risky. You don't know how strong the current is at the deepest point or if the flooding has eaten part of the road. Recipe for disaster.
We had no choice. We were stranded in the South Hills with no way to get home in one instance and about 20 miles from our hotel in the second.
 

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A number of years back, my wife and I rode out bikes down to the South Hills for a "bike night" at Quaker Steak and Lube. On the way there, we saw the storm clouds gathering and when we got to the restaurant, the heavens opened up and it poured for more than an hour. No big deal, right? We were inside, enjoyed our dinner and entertained the kids while we waited for it to pass. We tried to go home around 2100, well after the storm had passed, but were prevented from doing so because Sawmill Run Blvd (Rt51) was closed due to flooding. We took a few detours, one of which included a flooded section of Banksville Rd (Rt19) that was so deep that the water came up over my floorboards and submerged my bottom pipe.
I remember that storm.
I was commuting home from McMurray to the North Hills after closing up my business for the night...On a 150cc Vespa Scooter, no less.
I had to go on Sam Mill Run at some point and due to the flooding and debris, there was no way to get home that way. I had to head South instead of North and guess my way up to whatever high roads that weren't blocked or flooded that I thought would get me back home. It took me over four hours to make a trip that usually took 45 minutes. :surprise:
 

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We had no choice. We were stranded in the South Hills with no way to get home in one instance and about 20 miles from our hotel in the second.
I know John. I have just done so much stream fishing in knee-deep water that looks calm and you step into it and the current is really strong. Dodged overturned vehicles that thought they could cross flooded roads...
I personally am not comfortable crossing flooded roads unless I can absolutely see the road is intact and the water is very shallow. Flood water is deceptively powerful.
 

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I think it was sea water back feeding through storm drains.
Washing the bike now. It started just fine, rode to a car wash just fine, waiting for it to cool down before a bath ?
I wouldnt use the car wash high pressure hose I would use the garden hose that wont rip into the wiring


the pressure washer has too much power and can cause unwanted trouble
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I think it was sea water back feeding through storm drains.
Washing the bike now. It started just fine, rode to a car wash just fine, waiting for it to cool down before a bath ?
I wouldnt use the car wash high pressure hose I would use the garden hose that wont rip into the wiring


the pressure washer has too much power and can cause unwanted trouble

I keep the nozzle away 2-3 feet. I’ve washed my bike this way many times, no problem.

I live in an apartment in a large building, and there is no access to water hoses outside. Have to use self service car washes. They are not ideal, but have to do with what is available.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Man riding on flooded roads is really risky. You don't know how strong the current is at the deepest point or if the flooding has eaten part of the road. Recipe for disaster.
Agree, but sometimes there is no other choice, or alternative is even less favorable.
 

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On the c50, I did cross through 2-3" of water without a problem; ride nice and smooth with no abrupt actions.
Water is amazingly powerful.
 
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