Suzuki Volusia Forum banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Not a fun ride to work. Traveling west on a four lane divided highway. In the left lane behind a pickup truck doing 60 indicated. Another pickup shoots across the eastbound lanes and into the merge lane for heading west. Does he wait to merge? Of course not. Pulls right in front of the truck in front of me who slams his brakes on. I get on my brakes hard and start going sideways. I let off the brakes and it begins to straighten up but is wobbling fiercely. I'm heading off to the left and will miss the truck but know I'm about to go down. I regain control a split second before I hit the curb of the median. That bounces me into the eastbound lane and fortunately no head-on traffic coming. I get it stopped and down shift until I get back in first. I get out of the lane and into the median. I should have taken a few minutes to collect myself. When there was a break in westbound traffic I started coming off the median. I went over the curb at too much of an angle and dropped the bike. By that time traffic was upon me. The lead vehicle (another truck) stopped, let me get the bike up, and back on the road. I'll look the bike over later. I think if there's any damage it would be from hitting the curb as that was quite a jolt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,351 Posts
Safety zone

You were riding too close behind the pickup! Two to three seconds behind a vehicle gives you more than enough time and space to stop quickly AND safely.

You saw the second pickup enter and cut across the lanes and should have backed off a little to see what was happening. Did he do some thing stupid? Yes!

"Live to ride" means riding smart enough to be alive to ride. Leave that safety zone of two or three seconds and scan the road ahead for possible problems, then react properly.

I watched a crotch rocket zip by in the right lane passing traffic and he was oblivious of the closed lane due to several vehicles stopped. The center lane was bumper to bumper,so there was no room for hi me to get back in. And being the bad boy running down the empty lane, no on was going to ALLOW him to cut back in. So, he sat there as I passed two lanes over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
It looks like AikintuNY was there too since apparently he knows how close you were to that truck!!

I'm glad you are ok. The bike can be fixed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,351 Posts
Learn from others

Learn from others'mistakes, so you don't end up in the same spot.


Kcroz did not say what he was going to do differently the next time he is riding. Some people will keep doing the same thing until the outcome changes. Riding a bike, the other outcome would be death, serious injury or the loss of the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,465 Posts
What an experience. Hope the bike is not damaged too much. Get back on and be a better rider for it. Those of us that have had an instance like this know, in most cases, it was preventable. 2-3 seconds may be a safe distance but more important is the sight line and decision making distance. It's imperative when in close quarter traffic to make a sight line that gives the rider several seconds as a buffer. Don't let the vehicle directly in front of you make decisions for you. The accordion effect closes up quickly at highway speed. It all went bad for me once when two vehicles ahead created a situation that gave me almost zero options. It's all about options. Be safe...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,099 Posts
Just curious how long you've been riding? Those sound like new rider mistakes.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,258 Posts
I lost count how many defensive driving courses I've taken, including skidpan training.......I wasn't about to correct this member but, I felt the need to back up those that have said something.

Cagers are out to kill us so, lets all learn from each other and remain safe. :wayhappy:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
20,463 Posts
glad you're ok...I'm sure you will react differently the next time you see some idiot carelessly pulling out onto a highway and you will allow yoursellf more of a cushion to react defensively. Take care. Sh*t happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Learn from others'mistakes, so you don't end up in the same spot.


Kcroz did not say what he was going to do differently the next time he is riding. Some people will keep doing the same thing until the outcome changes. Riding a bike, the other outcome would be death, serious injury or the loss of the bike.
I agree with you. This incident should be a learning experience.
My comment was more along the lines that in my opinion, and with all due respect, the accuracy of your statement is questionable as we weren't there to judge. He could have locked the rear tire with plenty distance ahead of him. As a matter of fact, he was able to clear the truck even though he was skidding, which we know extends the breaking distance, so I'm kind of thinking that he possibly had enough distance to stop the bike. If I were to give some advice to Kcroz, is to practice breaking in a control environment so when (not if) he finds himself in the same situation, he is able to stop the bike within the shortest distance possible.
He also did not take the time to get it together, which is of most importance. If you are not mentally up to it, don't turn that wrist!

But yeah, you are totally right. Learn from it and remain safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
795 Posts
I too am glad he's OK, I can tell you from my years of experience as a state certified CDL instructor that the term is [ SEE ] Search/sight evaluate execute, the lesson here is always leave yourself more room and leave yourself a alternative way out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Hi KCROZ,
I bet dat pucker factor was tighter then ****'s hat band!
The good thing is that "The Man" was looking out for ya!!
Thanks For Your Service!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Looked the bike over carefully and no apparent damage. Felt normal riding home. Put the bike on the lift and looked it over one more time. The bike seems fine. Nerves are a bit frayed.

I sincerely appreciate the "glad you're okay" responses and suggestions.

The purpose of my post this morning was mostly to remind folks how quickly a situation can unfold and hopefully learn something from my story that might prevent something similar happening to them. I wrote it as soon as possible while my memory was fresh. I wasn't in a good state of mind to write anything else (plus I had work to do). The reflections, contributing factors, and lessons learned follow.

1) As was eloquently pointed out by AikinutNY, and probably obvious to everyone else, I was following too close. It was dark and I should have given myself even more following distance than I usually do (which is at least 3 seconds…I don’t like being close).

2) My head was not in the game. Mentally, I probably assumed the truck pulling across the highway and into the merge lane would have stopped (lesson: don't assume, prepare for the worse). I pride myself in maintaining good situational awareness but it flat wasn’t there this morning.

3) Probably the biggest lesson and the most useful suggestion (from ion) is to practice emergency braking. I know I'm not utilizing the front brake enough. I think it's because back in my bicycling days I once went over the handlebars when I locked the front brake up. I know the front provides more braking power and now I'm better motivated now to bolster my braking skills. With most new vehicles equipped with ABS, it makes me need to be better. I'd bet the truck in front of me was ABS equipped as it looked pretty new and kept an arrow straight line under very heavy braking.

4) Finally, and you knew it was coming, new rider. Five months, just over 2000 miles.

I do take lessons to heart. I will be a better rider because of this.

Thanks again for the kind comments and suggestions. Hope this post is useful to someone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,871 Posts
I too am glad he's OK, I can tell you from my years of experience as a state certified CDL instructor that the term is [ SEE ] Search/sight evaluate execute, the lesson here is always leave yourself more room and leave yourself a alternative way out.
I leave about 4 to 6 seconds buffer at 55+ mph but it seems to encourage the cagers to fill that gap even though I am maintaining the same speed as the vehicle in front of me, sort of a catch 22. Do you guys get the same thing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,321 Posts
I leave about 4 to 6 seconds buffer at 55+ mph but it seems to encourage the cagers to fill that gap even though I am maintaining the same speed as the vehicle in front of me, sort of a catch 22. Do you guys get the same thing?
Absolutely! And it makes me nutz. They force you to tailgate or they cut in front of you weather you are on your bike or in the car. And do not use their directional signals.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top