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I'm trying to get an '07 C50 Boulevard back up and running that's been sitting for a couple of years (with no prep) and that apparently developed a pinhole in the tank during that time as well. I was hoping I could siphon the old gas out, put some fresh gas in there, and at least try to start it and see what happened, but what I siphoned out ended up being the color and consistency of chocolate milk. Based on that and what I can see through the filler hole, the tank is in really bad shape, and I'm sure best case scenario is that the strainer on the fuel pump is completely clogged, and it may have gotten down into the injectors. I'm trying to get the tank off to do some more investigating, but I'm having trouble getting the line disconnected from the bottom of the tank. Is there a trick to it, or are they just stubborn? I've tried squeezing both sides of the white clip and pulling it off, but it won't budge. I don't want to break it just because I'm missing some non-obvious thing.

I'm pretty comfortable working on bikes in general, but I don't know these bikes in particular. In addition to the tank, injectors, and fuel pump strainer I'm going to do the usual engine oil & filter, coolant, final drive oil, and fork oil, is there anything else common to these bikes I should watch out for? Are the radiators prone to rusting? From what I can tell it doesn't look like there's a fuel filter past the the strainer on the fuel pump, is that right? If they're not OEM, will inline filters stand up to the PSI of the fuel pump? Most of my bikes are carbureted, but I do like running a clear filter inline to be able to see gas flowing and how dirty it may be.
 

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Generally, we recommend people stay away from barn finds like this. If there is a pin hole already in the tank, then the tank and all of its internals are junk. You can try to remove the fuel sender unit from the bottom, but chances are the rust has attacked those components as well. I would not bother worrying about saving the fuel line at this point - the rubber is most likely cracked and brittle and it would be a good idea to replace it. It uses a Chrysler style fuel line connector, so you can make one when the tank is off.

Once the tank is off, remove everything. The fuel pump, strainer, float assembly need to be cleaned and the metal parts put it in an electrolysis bath. This is a slightly base solution and electrical current to force the rust off the metal parts and onto another anode.


The tank itself is probably shot, but you can find places online to send it to, where they will do a complete internal cleaning and professionally reline the interior. This may or may not work, given the existing pin hole leaks so be prepared to buy a new tank if they say no joy.

lastly, if fuel was touching it, it is a good bet it is ruined, so the fuel injectors need to come off the bike and either be flow tested or replaced. Someone figured out that you can use a $25 honda civic injector as a replacement.

Barn finds can be fun projects, but they can also be monumental nightmares as well. Good luck!
 

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It's actually not my bike. It belongs to a friend and he wants to know what it's going to take to get it running, so this is mostly exploratory at the moment (but a new tank is pretty much a given). I finally got the clip off of the throttle body end and pulled the tank off, so now I can start digging into it. The sludge that was in the tank was incredibly gross, but the level was low enough that the fuel pump wasn't fully submerged. Everything that had collected on the bottom part of the fuel pump wiped right off, so it may be able to be salvaged yet. The injectors will be interesting.
 

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I haven't had a C50 in years but I just recently revived an 89' Bronco 2 (EFI) that had been sitting for about 4 years. Tank less than half full of fuel.......no idea how recent. It would not hold fuel pressure overnight and the fuel gauge didn't read. Replaced that assembly and inspected the inside of the tank. Added some FI cleaner in the tank and it's running fine.....I'll run this half tank through and repeat with the next tank. Barn finds can be fun if you are through and patient.
 

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I haven't had a C50 in years but I just recently revived an 89' Bronco 2 (EFI) that had been sitting for about 4 years. Tank less than half full of fuel.......no idea how recent. It would not hold fuel pressure overnight and the fuel gauge didn't read. Replaced that assembly and inspected the inside of the tank. Added some FI cleaner in the tank and it's running fine.....I'll run this half tank through and repeat with the next tank. Barn finds can be fun if you are through and patient.
I finally got the tank off, it's pretty much toast. There's a ton of sludge in there that's going to be next to impossible to get out, plus whatever pinhole or pinholes that would need to be tracked down and fixed one way or another. It's a shame, because otherwise the inside of the tank looks surprisingly good. The good news is that it looks like the strainer on the fuel pump did its job (although it shredded when I tried to clean it, so it's going to have to be replaced); what I can see of the fuel line, rails, and throttle body all look like they're in good shape, and the pump looks like it should be OK with a good cleaning as well. I'm going to pull the throttle body and check the injectors more closely next. Here's a picture of what I drained out of the tank:
144533
 

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The c50 does (unusually) have a secondary fuel filter. It's the round metal puck in the middle of the "U" shaped tank assembly. On mine that had completely rotted out internally and you could blow effortlessly right through it, which I discovered after I scraped out about a 1/2" thick patty of rusty moosh plastered in there.

I dealt with a similar case of a c50 that had been sitting unprepared for several years. Same deal, rusty nasty tank, although I don't think it was quite as bad as yours and the tank was not leaking. The fuel pump actually powered up, but died within a week, so plan on replacing that (I've had good luck with the "Kemso" brand aftermarket- they're ~$30, and i've seen them in service in several bikes for several years without issues). Suzuki, like most brands, only sells the fuel pump as the entire assembly for around $500 bucks. I needed a regulator also, which I was unable to find aftermarket, and got lucky and snagged an entire used OEM tank assembly off ebay for $25 from a bike stripper company, which was in excellent condition. Injectors can generally be cleaned via ultrasonic cleaner, or you can buy little kits on ebay with wiring to power them off a 9v battery and an adapter to fit them onto a can of carb cleaner to blast them clean. They work fairly well.

Electrolysis does work but it's far from the ideal method for gas tanks, as it will totally destroy any paint finish as well. Evapo-Rust works well but is fairly pricey, and in most cases takes a couple days for full effect, more if you need to rotate the tank occasionally to get all surfaces (like if you only have 1 gallon- it's $25/gallon, so buying enough to actually fill the tank is pricey). However it is harmless to plastic or rubber components and does not harm paint. Vinegar is the old standby, mix 1 cup salt per gallon vinegar to "supercharge" it and speed up the action. It's a mild enough acid it doesn't ruin rubber or plastic, but will still damage paint if not cleaned up promptly. But it's cheap and works. I don't recommend any stronger acids (like Muriatic)- while they do work like a hot damn, they are extremely dangerous to handle, will rapidly ruin paint, and the fumes will make everything in your shop rust, so use it outside only. I've heard Muriatic cut 1:2 with water is a good compromise- still works much faster than vinegar, but watered down enough it doesn't make you choke if you smell it and is a little more forgiving.

If the tank is leaking it'll have to be repaired (if possible) or lined. Redkote used to be the gold standard for this, but none seem to hold up well with the ethanol blend fuels now, despite claims to the contrary. I've seen loads of these liners slowly dissolve and endlessly clog filters and injectors. Kreem is notorious for this. At that point you're better off throwing the whole thing away.

Some radiator shops will repair/coat gas tanks, start calling around. I'd also peruse ebay and other outlets to see if you might get a complete replacement tank in better condition. While that will probably run several hundred dollars, by the time you add up professional tank repair, rust removal, coating, new pumps and other parts, ect, it might be more cost effective and a whole lot easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the pointers on the Kemso and injector testers, I think I'm going to give both of those a try. Still undecided about what to do about the tank, though. I haven't had a whole lot of luck finding a used one that's not beat to hell that somebody's still asking $100 for.
 
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