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I seem to ride for hours to the left. Or to the right. Or so it would seem to the people behind me. I cannot for the life of me remember to cancel my signals. Is there any sort of self canceling signal switch available? I do believe that some bikes do have canceling signal switches.
I too use the KisanTech Signalminder https://www.kisantech.com/view_product.php?product=SM-3SV and the many features included are a godsend to senile 75 y.o.ers like moi. The hardest part in installation was squeezing the module under the lower left-hand engine cover and mounting with velco. Everything has functioned perfectly for the past 4 years and yesss, their tech support is exemplary. I love the added bonus of having the rear turn signals as running lights. I also use the Kisan Technologies rear brake light bulb flasher module which is just a simple bulb plug-in.

My SignalMinder is the older model that doesn't have the turn signals flashing when the brakes are applied. Att'n: Suzuki Marketing Dept.: Until Kisan, absence of self-cancelling lights function might have been a bike purchase deal breaker. Having a gear indicator (that Suzuki had on my GS-850) is also a nice inclusion with a bike.:cry:
 

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Just got back from the 2012 Progressive International Bike Show in Washington D.C.. I spoke at length with Terry and Ron at the Suzuki display on the mods that I did on my bike as I felt they were neccessary for safety and convience. They both seemed intrigued and interested. They had never heard of KisanTech and Terry was interested for his personal 'Busa.
 

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Is anyone using a KRISS industries unit on their 05 and up c50's. the reason I'm asking is beause their site says it can't be use on a canbus bike and my 07 is a canbus system according to the dealer

Thanks
Dan
 

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Can-Bus technology is BMW....The only Suzuki Models that I have read that have any of the Can-Bus Technology is the Hayabusa and the Bandit 1250 but again, that is just what I have read...

LeoSA has some on his '09...
 

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Can is a serial bus developed by Bosch, and used extensively in automotive, industrial automation, and sometimes in medical equipment. I haven't personally seen a Suzuki using it, but I don't have experience with every Suzuki model. I can tell you the schematics for the 2005 C50 models do not have it.
 

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Steve, I have only read where it is used in the lighting system ( for the Xenon lighting)of those above mentioned bikes...I'm not going to buy one nor ride one but I like to read about go-fast bikes...lol
 

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BB,
It's possible. I definitely don't have a vast knowledge base of all the different bikes out there (even though I like to read about them too :) ). I know it become more common-place all the time. It's a good way to decrease wiring. The microcontrollers that have CAN built in these days are ultra cheap.
 

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I also don't see what they are talking about after looking at a electrical schematic of my bike that is in my clymer manual unless they are talking about the ecu, but what the kriss thech told me is that the bikes with canbus have everything intergrated on a mother board like a computer so there is no access to the signal relay. On our bikes the signal relay is intergrated with the kick stand relay in one unit but they are 2 different relays within the unit itself and we have access to them sepearetly with the wires on the back where it plugs in, so I think we have to splice at that location.
I will check that when I get back from vacation
 

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A device on a can bus will have (typically) 4 wires coming into a control module; 2 are the serial data lines, CanH and CanL, and the other two are supply and ground. The idea is that many devices with an address share the bus. Those with a lower address take precedence over the ones with a higher address. A typical example would something like this: you press the turn signal switch. The ECU (or some other controller) issues a message on the bus, with an address code first (earlier versions used 11 bit addresses... I think later was 20 bit... can't remember). If two devices start at the same time, the lower address "wins" and the other device detects a higher priority command and stops it's message (until the line has cleared). The command data is sent across the bus, and the appropriate light control module receives the message and turns on the turn signal.
All it is, is a communications scheme. Rather than having a pair of wires for each device and a switch relay or transistor at a central point, there are two com and two power supply wires that go to all the control modulels. From the receiving module to the load it drives, you will have normal circuitry, like relays and transistors, etc. But it's much more integrated, specific, and localized. No more "easy tapping into wires".
It allows more information about what is going on to be sent as a serial data stream. There might be multiple networks on any given vehicle- a fast one for high priority devices, like sensors and engine / transmission control, and a slow one for normal-priority stuff like turning on your headlight- stuff that isn't really time critical. That way, there aren't too many collisions (where one device tries to own the bus at the same time as another) for time sensitive stuff.
 

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Many threads on this subject.. try searching for various options.

I put a Radio Shack beeper on my bike. $3 and about 1/2 hour install.
I used a pair of relays to maintain the turn signal. I put a brake light switch on my shifter that drops out the turn signal relay when I shift up.
 
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