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Discussion Starter #1
Last summer the C90 drive blew a seal and oil all over my nice whitewalls

Since it was prime riding time, I popped the oem drive in and put the C90 drive in the "winter maintenance" lineup.

Changed the seal this winter and now it's time to reinstall on the bike, thought I'd include some pics.

I went to the trouble of installing the oem C90 driveshaft complete, as if it would be if someone recieved an unmodifed drive.


The decision then must be made, modify a C50 driveshaft, modify a C90 driveshaft, or modify a universal joint. Aric Balster can modify a C50 driveshaft by moving the shoulder back .200. DJHillis can do a cut, sleeve, reweld of a C90 driveshaft, or any competent machine shop can do either as well as modify a universal joint. I happen to have a Balster modded C50 shaft, so I'll use it.

Remove grease seal


Remove circlip (snapring)


Separate driveshaft from drive coupler. You will have drive with coupler, spring behind drive shaft, driveshaft, circlip, and grease seal.


I have laid out parts for reassembly.

Final drive (C90/VL1500 or VS1400)

Modified driveshaft (VL800/C50 with shoulder moved back .200 or C90 cut sleeved, rewelded or stock unmodified VL800/C50 if installing a modified U-joint.

C90 spring

New grease seal (p/n 09283-30026)

Moly 60 grease

Snapring (circlip) suzuki recommends NOT reusing a circlip, but I reuse 'em anyway.


You have another decision to make as far as spacer, bushing or a combination spacerbushing.

VL1500 and C90 drives use a larger axle than VL800/C50 so the axle hole must be matched to the smaller axle size. I have a bushing to do that I got from Aric Balster. 19.94mm O.D and 16.70 I.D. You will also need an axle spacer 2 7/8ths long. Some just cut 2mm off an oem spacer, or you can use a piece of tubing.


Some people use a spacer with a bushing already machined into the end of it. This is the type DJHillis provides.


My Balster bushing pushed into the C90 drive case. Reminder, the bushing is not necessary when using a VS1400 drive. Spacer yes, bushing no.


Before install the drive shaft into the final drive, liberaly grease splines with Honda Moly paste ***THIS IS A CRITICAL STEP***IT WILL PREVENT DRIVESHAFT SPLINE FAILURE***

Install C90 spring, driveshaft of choice, circlip and new grease seal (suzuki calls it an oil seal, but what do they know).

I have had these seals pop out on me, after install (I gently tap them in place with hammer and small drift), I drizzle alittle thread locker around the seam between the new seal and the coupler, seems to help hold it in place.

Ready for install


Prep bike for wheel/tire removeal and remove left side "fake swingarm"


Prep right side for wheel/tire/brake removeal


Remove wheel/brake assembly


Remove 3 cap nuts from oem final drive and remove final drive from swingarm


Decision time again. The new final drive bolt pattern is just slightly larger than the oem pattern. You have two options, you can drill all three holes oversize using a 9/16ths drill bit or step bit, or you can simply file the holes oblong with a rat tail file. Filing removes alittle less material, drilling probably goes faster. Either way will work. If you drill you may need bushings if you ever want to reinstall you oem drive. I filed my holes with an air die grinder.





I removed the paint from from the area that needed to be ground out and used the C90 bearing plate (metal gasket) as a pattern to show me where to remove metal by filing.


Don't forget (like I did) to grease the u-joint end of the driveshaft and install the unit onto the swingarm, make sure there is a "bearing plate" (metal gasket) between the final drive case and swingarm mount flange. I had to remove mine and add the moly grease and was very very lucky, one stab each time and the driveshaft spines engaged the u-joint perfect. It is rare when that happens for me, I usually have to use a broom handle to reposition the u-joint. Tighten the mount nuts.


Make sure axle spacer is intalled in final drive


This is a good time to fill with 90 weight gear oil while the tire/wheel are not in the way


Reinstall wheel/brake assembly. I use a platform scissors jack to raise the wheel up to the final drive.


Reinstall brake assembly, adjust as necessary, torque wheel nut, install cotter pin (I was all out so I have a tempary hitch pin in there.
Anytime I do any rear wheel work I always have to finish up with alittle Wesley's bleach white.


There you have it, a final drive mod and install. Hope the pics help, and as always feel free to ask any questions.
 

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Looks like your wife let you use her side of the garage...:biglaugh:..nice write-up
 

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Yeah - what BB said!

Why is the garage so clean and neat? That's against the law! :biglaugh:

.
 

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Yeah - what BB said!

Why is the garage so clean and neat? That's against the law! :biglaugh:

.
X~4! How do you find anything in that place? :biglaugh:

Thanks for the images and write up Viper...great job as usual! 8)
 

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Nice Viper- I Nominate for a sticky- This is nice and complete...
seconds???
 

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I'm curious as to why you didn't use the lift table. :???:

I'm thinking with the scissor jack on the table and the floor plate out, it would be a job done standing up. I know most don't have the table and I got rid of the bike lift in favor of the table.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm curious as to why you didn't use the lift table. :???:

I'm thinking with the scissor jack on the table and the floor plate out, it would be a job done standing up. I know most don't have the table and I got rid of the bike lift in favor of the table.
The table works great for getting the bike up to a good working height, but the floor plate leaves alittle to be desired.

It's alittle combersome dropping that wheel and tire out of the floor plate, it just barely fits and it's a real PIA for a fat old fart like me to lift it back up in there.

With the bike lift I can pull the wheel tire and only have to drop it an inch or two, then lift the bike to clear the wheel/tire.

It's all about working smarter. (and being lazy)
 

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Guess there is not enough room to set the table lift down on the wheel either.

Check out this set-up.

"I have the old Harbor Frieght narrow drop tail 1000# lift, and it has no problem with my valk up as high as it can go. I added a 5' piece of angle to the front to spread out the tie down locations as i dont trust a wheel lock, and when it is up all the way, I put a couple jack stands up under the angle to add some support. So far it has worked great!

In these pics you can see the angle and the tie downs with lift up maybe 2'6" up from full down position.


The drop tail is super nice to pull a tire with out pulling the fender."




 

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So I'm accumulating the parts necessary to make this swap happen, and came across a thread that mentions that the alloy wheels have slightly different hub lengths. Does that create an issue using the bushing/spacer configuration described in this thread and elsewhere?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
It can.....

Alloy wheels use two wheel bearings on the left side wheel hub and one bearing on the right (brake) side.

There is some tolerance as to how far into the hub the bearings are pressed.

There have been a couple of instances where the alloy wheel hub has rubbed on the backing plate mount bolts, this is caused by the bearings being pressed slightly deeper than flush with the hub casting and renders the normal 2 7/8ths spacer slightly too short.

The addition of a medium thichness washer to the axle, in addition to the spacer usually does the trick and prevents interferance with the wheel hub and backing plate bolts.

I recommend adding the washer (if needed) to the hub side of the spacer.

I became aware of this after a VR member with cast wheels experienced the interferance. We went though heck figuring out that his spacer was simply a mm too short.

When I got my own cast wheels and installed the bearings, that's when I discovered the bearings can be pressed in slightly farther than absolutly necessary.

I reccomend that people press the first bearing in full depth and the second bearing just flush with the casting.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
No, and that really is not a very good picture.

First insert spacer #25 into the final drive, then slide axle 19 through drive (and through spacer) then install washer onto axle and against spacer, then install wheel/tire assembly onto final drive and push axle through to other side.

The effect is to make the spacer longer by the lenth of the washer.

Now, something to think about, at 2 7/8ths inch, the spacer is 2mm shorter than an oem spacer, so maybe an oem spacer would be just the right lenth.
 

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This was great I am about to install my drive that came back from Aric last week.

I have also picked up that the splines" where the wheel mounts to the drive should also be greased. Is that true?

Arthur
 

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Discussion Starter #19
This was great I am about to install my drive that came back from Aric last week.

I have also picked up that the splines" where the wheel mounts to the drive should also be greased. Is that true?

Arthur
Maybe not as critical, but it certainly does not hurt.
 
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