Suzuki Volusia Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,477 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been following Blazerjim and his problems with buying a bike that sat in storage - looked great but is turning into a money pit. I feel for the guy, riding should be fun, these are great bikes and he should be on the road and not dealing with this sh*t.

I'd like to start a thread specific to this topic as opposed to a specific bike - what to look for and the dangers of buying a bike that has sat unridden for a stretch. How to spot a hidden gem and to avoid a nightmare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
452 Posts
Good topic. I guess I will jump in since I bought a 2007 C50 in the spring of 2013 that had 2,200 miles and had been sitting in the dealer's warehouse for at least two years.


  • I checked the inside of that tank with a flashlight for signs of rust. It was clear.
  • I popped the air filter cover looking for nesting spiders or rodents that might have made their way into the throttle bodies. No issues.
  • I checked the oil to see if it was cloudy from moisture. It was clear but I asked that the dealer change the oil and filter before I took possession.
  • I also asked that the battery be replaced.
Other than bleeding the brake fluid, changing coolant, greasing the shaft splines, and replacing the final drive oil after I took possession of the bike, I have not had any age related issues. I replaced the tires this spring and plan on replacing the brake and gas hoses over the winter.


Good hunting
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,440 Posts
Sounds like what I would recommend Blinky! There's nothing wrong with a bike that has sat, but you need to be aware that a 10 year old bike with 1,000 miles on it is not necessarily a hidden gem and may not be as reliable as a 10 year old bike with 30,000 miles on it. It certainly is not the same as a 2 year old bike with 1,000 miles.

A lot of people see extremely low mileage as well cared for. Personally I see it as neglected.

It also depends on how the miles were out on. In Blinky's case, if that bike got 2,200 in two years and then sat for 4 I would trust it less than if it got 2,200 spread out evenly over 4 years then sat for two. My concern is that the bike was regularly ridden, even if it was only 10 miles a month.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
I saw a volusia that had 700 original miles on it on craigslist a couple years ago when I was in the market for one..but the bike was 7 years old...even with there low low asking price...I wouldnt even consider it....

was it even actually broke in before sitting for 6 years? NO THANK YOU
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
I was an idiot. Bought my '05 C50 last September with 3920 miles on it. That's less than 500 miles a year. I thought great, this like getting a brand new bike! Wasn't knowledgeable enough to check as carefully as Blinky. Fortunately, I was a lucky idiot and haven't had any trouble at all in the 4000+ miles I've put on it since.

After seeing the pitfalls of seldom used bikes on this forum and how my boat motor had degraded from lack of use with only 250 hours in 10 years, I would steer away from a similar deal now.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
28,465 Posts
Had a buddy that bought a 2003 Drifter in 2008 with only a couple thousand miles on it. He then let it sit in his garage for another six years. When he went to sell it last fall there were issues - dead battery; clutch frozen; tires dry rotted; brake lines cracked.

If you get a good price and as long as you go in knowing things like this should be serviced BEFORE you ride it then a low mileage bike is okay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,143 Posts
I bought my 07 Nomad in 2010 with only 2300 miles on it. I would have preferred buying one that had more consistent riding, but the guy had records of changing the fluids every year that he had it, and it was kept under a sheet inside the garage, and never ridden in the rain. I told him that was going to change, as I ride daily, in pretty much all weather, and there is no way I was taking the time to cover and uncover the thing every day...
Getting ready to turn over 50,000 miles on it, and expect to have another 6-7000 miles before celebrating the 4 year birthday later this fall. Only things I have had issues with were the normal things everyone on the Vulcan forums seems to deal with on most of the others out there.
Seems like a waste to buy a bike and not ride it, and things will deteriorate with lack of use. At least a bike with miles has demonstrated that it runs! Crap shoot with used bikes sometimes, but my wife and I have had good luck with the ones we had bought.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,440 Posts
As we've all said, low miles doesn't mean it's a lemon, just that you need to be aware that it can present its own unique set if issues. If the deal is good and you're prepared, go for it. The only thing is that some people seem to think they can charge a premium for low miles on the bike, and some poor buyers agree with them then find out all that glitters isn't gold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
I’m looking at a 2008 Yamaha Royal Star Venture with less than 5k miles on it for about $6k. I need more power but I’ve put a lot on my 03 Volusia 800. It’s a nice commuter bike with Mustang saddlebags and trunk. Any thoughts on the Yamaha Ventures? Maybe I should replace all fluids if I get it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
I can only assume that a decent percentage of the people here, have the Zen powers of motorcycle maintenances, or are at least willing to learn and try on their own. This is a huge consideration to take, when confronted with an older, non functioning, or poorly maintained vehicle of any type.

While parts can certainly add up, if you have to pay someone else to put them on, your investment in that machine could go upside down very, very quickly.

Case in point- I posted elsewhere that I've recently gotten a friend's inherited 82 Maxim 650 back on the road. Hasnt been registered in 30 years, but only had 3k put on it before going to sleep.
Rebuilding the carbs alone took me about 5 hours, not including removal or reinstallation. Paying someone to do that would be half the whole value of the entire bike! Let alone, the tires, fluid changes, etc.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Woodswoman

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
My point is, the more you can do, the better off you are, and the less your investment will be to get something back up and running if it's really rough. Or if something happens whole you own it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Any time I see an old car listed that says it's parts are "all original", I immediately categorize that as a project car. Bushings, fluid filled shocks, cables, wires, hoses... These things don't last forever, they're wearable items. They need replaced routinely to keep something reliable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I’m looking at a 2008 Yamaha Royal Star Venture with less than 5k miles on it for about $6k. I need more power but I’ve put a lot on my 03 Volusia 800. It’s a nice commuter bike with Mustang saddlebags and trunk. Any thoughts on the Yamaha Ventures? Maybe I should replace all fluids if I get it.
Yeah, first thing first, I would also consider about changing all the fluid in it. By the way, there are plenty of resources on the web where you can get useful information about bikes and stuff which bikers should wear, but this website is one of the most informative, in my opinion. It has really nice articles which help in choosing gadgets for bikes.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,982 Posts
Yeah, first thing first, I would also consider about changing all the fluid in it.
If it were me, I'd also change the tires. After 12 years, they are probably rotten, never mind how much tread they appear to have.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top