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Discussion Starter #1
Ok right off the bat I know I'm gonna be getting some crap for this. No its not (necessarily) for running from cops. More that I ride in winter a lot and sometimes the cold really puts a strain on my battery. I've had it die more than a couple times on cold mornings. I don't like that all the lights come on when you turn the key before the engine is started and would like a way to control the lights. I know this would probably be a better question for the sport bike forums but they don't know much about our bikes. I am pretty clueless when it comes to electrical stuffs, I have more of an engineering mind than an electrical one. I would like any tips/ideas/diagrams etc for doing this. Again I'm not trying to run from cops (my bike is WAY too loud to not be noticed) But I'm kinda board and would like a relatively cheap and easy(ish) thing to do that might also help me get as much juice as I can to the starter when I need it. Thanks!
 

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Give the thread a little time and i'm sure someone knowledgeable will reply .I don't have a wiring diagram .
 

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Maybe it's time for a new battery????
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Maybe it's time for a new battery????
I've gotten a new battery, and has a lifetime warranty so I can replace it when it goes bad (I'm on the second one so far) but yeah Obviously not the greatest quality. Someday I plan on getting a G-batt but not at the moment.. And that wouldn't solve my current desire to mess with things. :twisted:
 

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Is a battery tender an option?? time delay relay would be the only option. It would keep the lights off until the bike starts. You could put a weatherproof switch on the headlight bucket but you would forget to turn then light back on.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I do have a battery tender and use it most of the time. Generally my bike starts right up if I keep it in the garage.. But as I say I sometimes stay out and have to deal with starting it up after a cold night out and that's where things fail. I'm not too concerned about forgetting to have lights on. But yeah also just looking for a simple enough project to do. There are times that I want the lights on when the bike is off as well. (looking for things, working on stuff. ) I tend to go well off road sometimes and that's the only light around. I really just want control of things
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I haven't had it on the tender for the last couple weeks (haven't been riding lately either) started up just fine today. So I don't think that's the problem. When I'm out all night when it's below zero is when it becomes a problem.
 

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I've gotten a new battery, and has a lifetime warranty so I can replace it when it goes bad (I'm on the second one so far) but yeah Obviously not the greatest quality. Someday I plan on getting a G-batt but not at the moment.. And that wouldn't solve my current desire to mess with things. :twisted:
JesterTop - I get it! The desire to mess with things, tweak it and make it your own. My answer is just go for it. If you've got the balls to tackle it and a little understanding for electrical systems you can figure it out. I recently added additional driving lights and added the switch on the neck guard.
ImageUploadedByMO Free1390366753.816812.jpg
Hard to see but thats the point. Maybe something like that would work for you? I'll keep following your progress, don't give up.


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As the only idiot round here crazy enough to ride year round regardless of weather, I get ya....especially as I have DUAL headlights (and double the draw). These bikes absolutely hate cold to begin with and really cold only makes it that much harder to get them to turn over. I ended up putting mine on a heavy toggle in the ground circuit (doesn't effect high low switching, and is easier than sorting out a switch for the hot (+) side), still lights the marker and tail lights, but removing the 110-130+ watts sucked by the headlamps does wonders for helping the bike start in 40 deg.F down to sub-freezing temps (my bike lives outside year round as I've nowhere to park it inside.)
 

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I haven't had it on the tender for the last couple weeks (haven't been riding lately either) started up just fine today. So I don't think that's the problem. When I'm out all night when it's below zero is when it becomes a problem.[/QUOTE]

You da MAN. You go boy!!! My feet and my cat will be up on the lazyboy. Send me a report!:biglaugh:
 

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The starter motor may not have enough torque to turn a cold engine at 0 degrees.


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It has enough torque (barely) at -5 deg. F. But it draws VERY heavily on the battery which also puts out less power at colder temps. If not started at least dally after temps drop to regularly bellow 40, mine will turn, but won't fire at all without repeated attempts spaced about 5 minutes apart...with the lights on the battery heads south way fast Vs starting at 50+ deg. F. . Just the nature of the bike....the carbed ones at least.
 

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I think I may have got you sorted. The issue is I no longer have my Vol to test my theory. If you are only trying to turn off the rear lighting, this should work for you.

Take off your seat to access your wiring harness. You will find a white connector with wires running to a hole in the back fender. This is the wiring harness for the rear lights.



From this harness you will find a black wire with a white tracer, labeled "B/W" in the schematic. This should be your negative wire for all the rear lighting. Use a test light to make sure that it the negative wire.



From here you should just be able to cut the wire, then install a switch inline with the wire.



Hope this helps. Again, I am not certain, as I can't test it myself, so test before you cut wires.
 

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Hrrmmm, makes sense to me. looks like all we needs is enough 14G wire to extend the taillight and headlight grounds to a conveniently located, double pole / single throw switch (DP/ST). Could use a SP/ST but that would lack the advantage of keeping both circuits separate...and two SP/ST's would lack the convenience of having one switch to kill the lights. DP/ST Has both the advantage of only one switch and by wiring the headlight to one pole and the tail to the other, the advantage of keeping both circuits separate
I'm fairly certain only one wire need be run to the headlight and one to the tail ground instead of from the splice to the switch and back so long as the toggle has one terminal for each circuit wired to a local ground (either the frame or the battery which ever is closer).

 

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The only light you need to turn of is the head light and Aux driving lights.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
As the only idiot round here crazy enough to ride year round regardless of weather, I get ya....especially as I have DUAL headlights (and double the draw). These bikes absolutely hate cold to begin with and really cold only makes it that much harder to get them to turn over. I ended up putting mine on a heavy toggle in the ground circuit (doesn't effect high low switching, and is easier than sorting out a switch for the hot (+) side), still lights the marker and tail lights, but removing the 110-130+ watts sucked by the headlamps does wonders for helping the bike start in 40 deg.F down to sub-freezing temps (my bike lives outside year round as I've nowhere to park it inside.)
I am eventually planning on switching all my lights to LEDs and the headlight to HID. I am currently waiting on an integrated LED tail light/signal kit. Suzuki Boulevard M50 LED Tail Light (I also recently got a M50 fender I'm switching out) But the rest will be when I find more money and probably not for awhile, But should help somewhat with the power overall. However I would like to still have control of things.


I think I may have got you sorted. The issue is I no longer have my Vol to test my theory. If you are only trying to turn off the rear lighting, this should work for you.

Take off your seat to access your wiring harness. You will find a white connector with wires running to a hole in the back fender. This is the wiring harness for the rear lights.



From this harness you will find a black wire with a white tracer, labeled "B/W" in the schematic. This should be your negative wire for all the rear lighting. Use a test light to make sure that it the negative wire.



From here you should just be able to cut the wire, then install a switch inline with the wire.



Hope this helps. Again, I am not certain, as I can't test it myself, so test before you cut wires.
Hrrmmm, makes sense to me. looks like all we needs is enough 14G wire to extend the taillight and headlight grounds to a conveniently located, double pole / single throw switch (DP/ST). Could use a SP/ST but that would lack the advantage of keeping both circuits separate...and two SP/ST's would lack the convenience of having one switch to kill the lights. DP/ST Has both the advantage of only one switch and by wiring the headlight to one pole and the tail to the other, the advantage of keeping both circuits separate
I'm fairly certain only one wire need be run to the headlight and one to the tail ground instead of from the splice to the switch and back so long as the toggle has one terminal for each circuit wired to a local ground (either the frame or the battery which ever is closer).

This is exactly the info I was looking for. Thanks guys I really appreciate it! :wayhappy:
 
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