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Discussion Starter #1
I bought this bike as a project. The previous owner took it to a shop because of engine noise. The shop disassembled it and diagnosed it as needing cam chains and guides. At that point the previous owner abandoned the bike and I feel I got an ok deal on the bike even though it was in pieces at the shop.
I purchased the bike and instead of blindly trusting the shop (they seemed shady to me) and putting new parts in it, I re-built the bike without changing anything to become familiar with it and to hear for myself the engine noise.
Can you please listen to the engine running in this video and let me know your thoughts/opinions? I'm not convinced it's the cam chains, they looked new as did the guides. The bike has 24k KMs (15k Miles). It's intermittent but present about 90% of the time. (I didn't run it long without the cooling system)
Thanks for your input!
 

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Yes, that is the timing chain. It may "look" fine, but that doesn't mean it IS fine. The PO abandoned the project because the parts and labor is nearly a $1500 us job. The chains, guides and adjusters will set you back around $600 us, not including the cost of replacement gaskets for the clutch cover and cylinder head covers. The rest is all labor. I hope you got the bike super cheap, because you just inherited an expensive repair.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
OK, thanks for your input. I'll tear it apart again and post here with my results and findings once complete.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Here's my findings: It was the rear cylinder rod bearing.
Take a look here.
 

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Wow. That's even worse. I know these engines have a habit of some piston slap, but that's rediculious.
 

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So given the amount of play on the rod bearing, what's your plan of attack? I would suspect you had some excessive lateral movement in the piston, which would have caused wear in both the piston and cylinder wall. I would also suspect that the crankshaft is going to be out of round as well, from the repeated impacts of the rod slamming into it at high RPM. The only time I have seen that level of failure is on an engine that was run dangerously low on oil and the bearing seized to the crankshaft. Good luck with your project.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I don't know the history of the bike, but yes, I imagine it was run low on oil. I'm going to attempt to split the crankcase (waiting on a rotor puller)and remove the bearing cap to take a closer look. I'll post back here with what I find. (y)
 

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Low oil was the most common failure mode when broken C50's came into the dealership. This engine is known to use some oil, which tends to get worse on higher miles motors or if the bike is frequently ridden at higher speeds- say 75+. Usually it's not so bad as to be a problem- in 3000 miles the oil would go from the upper mark to the lower (appx 1/2 quart) so as long as you kept up on changes or checked it now and then, unlikely to ever be a problem. But if maintenance was neglected and the bike run hard, after 6-7-8k miles the engine would probably be critically low on oil and cause damage.

This was a pretty common issue on the Burgman 400's as well. They were sort of marketed as a freeway capable scooter, and yes, they could do about 90mph flat out. But if you held it at 80mph all day, it would be more or less out of oil after a couple thousand miles.
 
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