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Thread: Longevity of rear brake pads? Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
05-03-2019 12:52 AM
pcdoctorcom I have 85K on my C50T and have never had to change the front or rear pads. I have only had to hit the brakes hard twice in 5 years. The rest of the time I use the front brake and the engine to slow down and stop. I just got the bike back from the shop for some warranty service and checked the front pads. Still the same. Not even half worn.

I have three sets of new brake pads, purchased when on sale. 1-ceramic, 1-sintered, and 1-organic. Not sure which I'll put on when it's time to change.

I have a new set of rear shoes too. But never needed them, through 5 rear tire changes. I did notice the casting on the current brake shoes looked to be about to rub the hub, so I took them to the belt sander and cleaned it up. Had almost as much pad material as the new ones, so I've never change them. Always adjusted the brake when changing the tire.


05-02-2019 07:58 PM
RellaLou In the past couple of years I have begun to use my rear brake for slow speed maneuvers & stops. If you haven't been using the rear brake, I guess I wouldn't be concerned. If not used, it cannot be worn out!
05-01-2019 02:54 AM
EazyDyz So ive pulled the back tyre.
Unfortunately my jack didnt lift the rear up high enough to roll the tyre out, so I had to take the final drive off and get it out of the side instead. Not a big issue as the drive had to come out anyway for servicing.

The drive shaft splines were mainly dry, dirty and some orange 'rust water' present, with old dirty grease at the drive end, and bone dry at the trans end.
Removed the dust seal, removed the snapring, degreased everything, applied a lot of molypaste, new dust seal, reassembled. Glad I did it.

Drum brakes, absolutely filthy. Covered in dust, dirt and some light surface corrosion. Cleaned thoroughly with brake cleaner, toothbrush and rags. Used some wet and dry to rough up the brake pads a little. They looked to be about 4-5mm thick.
All done and ready for the new tyre. Glad I did this, it was in dire need of some servicing
04-30-2019 01:25 PM
FireManC50 Thank you much!
04-30-2019 12:56 PM
Gene
Quote:
Originally Posted by FireManC50 View Post
Thank you for a thorough response! How does one detect overheating of the drum?
You will find info on the most common reasons for overheating at this link... and how to avoid it.

https://www.volusiariders.com/58-mot...otorcycle.html
04-30-2019 12:53 PM
Skrapiron It will turn colors. Usually a lovely shade of gold, flecked with some purple where it got really hot. It will also be severely out of round if overheated as well.
04-30-2019 12:21 PM
FireManC50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene View Post
With the rear brake lining being the sacrificial material.... and the shielding of the drum assembly from road dirt- the drum will outlast the bike - unless the drum is damages by overheating.... there is a service limit on the drum diameter - that is unlikely to ever be reached under our riding and ownership conditions.

Now if the bike has over 100k miles that might be a service inspection consideration....

In comparison, Automotive drum brakes have a general life expectancy of 2 sets of brake shoes under the riding conditions that we experience. There is no reason to expect different for these bikes.

Seeing as we will be changing rear tires much more often than anything else on this bike - except for oil and filters.... it is easy to check the lining thickness and the drum edge for any lip development due to wear.

Brake wear has never been an issue -whereas brake fade can be a concern under aggressive riding conditions - and metallic pads and shoes will help with that.

The down side of metallic linings is accelerated rotor and drum wear - but you still will find they will outlive your ownership for the next owner to worry about ..

IF you are now the ‘NEXT OWNER’, THEN you will want to do an inspection so you can defer the worry about it to —- the next owner....
Thank you for a thorough response! How does one detect overheating of the drum?
04-30-2019 10:30 AM
Gene
Quote:
Originally Posted by FireManC50 View Post
How about the rear drum? Any info on the lifespan?
With the rear brake lining being the sacrificial material.... and the shielding of the drum assembly from road dirt- the drum will outlast the bike - unless the drum is damages by overheating.... there is a service limit on the drum diameter - that is unlikely to ever be reached under our riding and ownership conditions.

Now if the bike has over 100k miles that might be a service inspection consideration....

In comparison, Automotive drum brakes have a general life expectancy of 2 sets of brake shoes under the riding conditions that we experience. There is no reason to expect different for these bikes.

Seeing as we will be changing rear tires much more often than anything else on this bike - except for oil and filters.... it is easy to check the lining thickness and the drum edge for any lip development due to wear.

Brake wear has never been an issue -whereas brake fade can be a concern under aggressive riding conditions - and metallic pads and shoes will help with that.

The down side of metallic linings is accelerated rotor and drum wear - but you still will find they will outlive your ownership for the next owner to worry about ..

IF you are now the ‘NEXT OWNER’, THEN you will want to do an inspection so you can defer the worry about it to —- the next owner....
04-30-2019 10:05 AM
FireManC50 How about the rear drum? Any info on the lifespan?
04-30-2019 08:19 AM
10-64 Traded the bike with original brakes with 43,000 kms on them
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