Riding high? - Page 3 - Suzuki Volusia Forums : Intruder Volusia and Boulevard Forum

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Old 11-25-2012, 09:27 AM   #21 (permalink)
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Default I stole this too.

I would like to ask, what's the difference in blinding another driver with hi-beams and blinding them with a blindfold? Blind is blind. I only flash my high beams when I see a left blinker.That helps the cage see me. On the interstate I run my hi-beam a little more than I should, but never when approaching another cage.

Stolen from a Kawasaki versys forum.

Scientific evidence supporting DRLs, high-beams, hi-viz
Up to this point I haven't seen a review of the scientific literature regarding the various safety implements that we as riders may choose to use: hi-viz, reflective junk, DRLs whether high- or low-beam, and headlight modulators. Having a bit of spare time I though I'd look through the literature to see if there's data behind the paranoia, and it looks as if there is some evidence indeed.

Torrez LI. MOTORCYCLE CONSPICUITY: THE EFFECTS OF AGE AND VEHICULAR DAYTIME RUNNING LIGHTS. PhD dissertation submitted to the University of Central Florida, 2008. (pdf link, click!) All emphasis in quoted sections below is mine unless explicitly noted. This dissertation, which I just found now thanks to Google Scholar, is a fantastic resource for safety-hounds.

Literature review with regard to daytime use of high-beam headlights, low-beam headlights (DRLs), and headlight modulators:
Quote:
[The Franklin Institute report] concluded that the use of high beam and low beam headlights dramatically increased the conspicuity of motorcycles, as was evident in their decreased accident involvement (Janoff et al., 1970).

...

[Williams and Hoffman] found that overall conspicuity was increased when high and low beam headlight conditions were compared to no light conditions in both cluttered and uncluttered environments and that compared to all the other implements tested, the high beam was most effective (Williams & Hoffman, 1979).

...

In [the 1981 study by Olson, Halstead-Nussloch, & Sivak] an actual motorcycle was equipped with various implements used to increase conspicuity such as fluorescent garments (discussed later in paper), running lights, high/low beam headlights, and modulating headlights (3 Hz) as well as respective coding devices. The results from this study indicate that during daytime [and nighttime] conditions, both low and high beam headlights as well as modulating headlights significantly improved conspicuity.
Literature review with regard to fluoro and hi-viz gear, including reflectivity and the chevron pattern:
Quote:
The colors white, crème, and lime yellow have all been found to be more conspicuous than any other color of vehicle in studies evaluating accident involvement (Allen, 1970; Solomon, 1990). The results from these studies are questionable as there is a high degree of validity as to confounding variables such as individual behavioral characteristics and color selection (do safer drivers choose white cars)

...

In the field of emergency vehicle design, it is extremely important in increase conspicuity as much as possible due to the particular types of situations and traffic these vehicles must navigate. In doing so, a large amount of research has been directed toward patterned vehicle applications, mostly overseas (Tijerina, 2003). One such potentially promising pattern is the Chevron pattern, or Harlequin “Battenburg Livery” as it is called in Europe (See Figure 2). This pattern apparently plays off of human perceptual cues by representing similarity to a horizontal barricade or bridge abutment, and consequently increasing conspicuity when applied to emergency vehicles (CVPI, 2004).

Figure 2:

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...

In a study conducted by (Woltman & Austin, 1973), motorcyclists equipped with fluorescent garments were detected much quicker than those wearing conventional colors under a variety of backgrounds, at a variety of angles. This was especially true under environmental conditions of dust and or dim illumination. As mentioned earlier in regards to vehicular lighting, Olson, Halstead-Nussloch, & Sivak (1981) additionally tested the effectiveness of fluorescent garments on motorcycle detection and found their use to effectively distinguish the motorcyclist from their surroundings via a gap acceptance paradigm. These findings have been supplemented by support from research on pedestrian and bicyclist conspicuity, where virtually every study done has concluded that both fluorescent and retro-reflective garments drastically improve conspicuity (for an exhaustive review see Kwan & Mapstone, 2004).
Experimental data and conclusions involving age, modulators/no modulators, and motorcycle conspicuity:

Quote:
The results indicate that there was not a significant difference [in reaction time or distance detection measures] between the headlight modulated condition and the headlight ON condition. This was likely the result of the environmental conditions tested in this study (clear day/rural intersection). Research shows that headlight modulators are most effective when used in inclement weather and congested areas.

...

This research found that it takes older adults over the age of 65 over 200ms longer to detect a motorcycle than younger adults. This is not only significant statistically, but when evaluated in terms of real world applicability, this equates to approximately 7-10 feet of distance for a motorcycle traveling at a rate of 25MPH (refer to Appendix O). If a motorcycle is traveling at 25MPH and it takes an older adult 200ms longer to respond to a motorcyclist, this poses a greater likelihood of accident for these vehicles since the motorcycle will be approximately 7-10 feet closer to the vehicle. This is especially dangerous when taking into consideration the type of crash typology evaluated, where the driver is situated in a left turn scenario.

...

The current research did not find any significant increase in motorcycle detection performance for older adults as a result of headlight modulators, but it would be interesting to see if other technologies purported to increase conspicuity had a beneficial effect for this particular group. In future research it would be advantageous to evaluate the effectiveness of rider clothing (fluorescent), motorcycle coloring/reflectivity/patterns, auxiliary headlights and flashing beacons as they relate to the motorcycle conspicuity performance of this higher risk group.
My conclusions/long-form Cliffs Notes:

1. There exists much epidemiological evidence that DRLs and daytime high-beam usage reduces accident rates, but this type of study is confounded by selection bias (ie, people who wear hi-viz are safer than those who wear wife beaters).
2. There also exists experimental and basic science evidence that shows that DRLs, high-beam usage, fluoro/hi-viz, and the chevron pattern are detected quicker and more reliably, especially in marginal conditions.
3. Old people have measurably slower reaction times, and this difference is significant enough to make the difference between turning in front of you vs. hitting the brakes. Unfortunately, headlight modulators do not "fix" this problem of old people.
4. Headlight modulators do not show a benefit above DRLs alone in the dissertation above, but in more urban/congested/poor lighting scenarios they might have a benefit.

You can draw your own conclusions from all the above, but I've already drawn mine as illustrated below:

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Old 11-25-2012, 08:32 PM   #22 (permalink)
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Always high beams on during the day. When I purchased my C50 the headlight was woefully out of adjustment, I took it back and made them readjust it to the proper height (I paid for the setup fee, they better properly set it up). Much better now. After adding the light bar it has plenty of light to be seen, especially during the day when it is the most likely time you will not be seen. Daytime driving with the high beams on will not blind the oncoming vehicle.
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Old 11-25-2012, 11:47 PM   #23 (permalink)
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Dam police should let us run strobes in our headlights, ain't nothing catches a persons eye quicker than a three quick flashes pause three quick flashes strobe setup...don't believe me, check out how quick the lights on a police car or ambulance get your attention next time you're out and about.
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Old 11-26-2012, 08:20 AM   #24 (permalink)
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Yes I stole this, funny


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Old 11-26-2012, 08:27 AM   #25 (permalink)
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Listen to the Monkey, get a lightbar. I never had one before this bike and will never be without some kind of lightbar again. It is much the best thing I have ever done for my safety. People SEE me!!!
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Old 11-26-2012, 12:54 PM   #26 (permalink)
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Lightbar. Wouldn't be without one.
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Old 11-26-2012, 02:47 PM   #27 (permalink)
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If running high beams don't expect drivers to squint to see your turn signals.

Here in Texas some years ago I noticed a billboard campaign by the local PD saying all vehicles should run high-beams in the daytime. Total BS if you ask me. It is bothersome for some drivers, makes turn signals hard to see, and waters down the effectiveness of bikers. On cars, daytime high-beams are completely unnecessary compared to low-beams, in my not so humble opinion.

On a bike, do whatever makes you feel safer.
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Old 11-26-2012, 03:39 PM   #28 (permalink)
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Let me make myself perfectly clear. Running high-beam lights during daytime hours is not bright. Now don't make me have to go and steal another post. IMO, somebodies been looking at the sun too long.

From ADVrider. copy and paste: better yet, stolen:

Reason not to use high-beams in daytime
Out for a ride this morning with my daughter, I saw a very bright light coming maybe a mile down the road. The weather was clear and the sun out but this light was so bright I could not make out the vehicle at all.

As I got closer the light slowly resolved into a wide headlamp and then possibly a couple of lights two or three feet apart. When I was within a couple of hundred feet I was finally able to discern a bike with dual headlamps and another bike alongside or staggered behind it. They appeared to be slowing and I looked as hard as I could but could not see any turn signal - couldn't say if it was on or not because it would have been completely overwhelmed anyway. With about a hundred feet to go the lead bike suddenly made as if to turn left in front of me. As he turned the blazing lights away from me, I saw a whole line of Goldwings - at least eight. I had already slowed considerably and now slammed on the brakes thinking this was some dipshit 'road captain' who was going to try and block traffic for his group to turn. Not sure if the lead rider was just having a nasty wobble as he came to a halt or whether he changed his mind about leading the group in a left turn across in front of me but he suddenly veered straight again and thankfully stopped so I was able to let off the brakes and drive past.


I have never made of habit of riding with my high beam on in daytime but I know quite a few people who do. Based upon this experience, I am now very sure I never will, and will counsel others to stop doing so. I noted and wish to stress the following negative issues with this practice:
  • I could not tell what was coming towards me until I was nearly on top of them. I guessed it was a bike but it was a total surprise to me to find a whole column of them
  • I still have no idea if any of the bikes had their turn signals on - I have to assume they did but could not see anything
  • It took a long while for me to work out that the bike(s) were slowing
  • I did not see the road that the bikes were planning to turn into unitl the very last minute - and this was in bright daylight - had it been overcast, raining or toward or dusk I would have been able to see even less
  • Despite my trainng and observation habits I was "target fixated" Had I been a sleepy or drunken driver of a lrage vehicle, things might not have gone well for this group
It may be worth noting that I have excellent eyesight, no glasses or contact lenses and was looking out through a nearly new, clean, gold-mirrored faceshield. If I had glasses and a hazy, insect smeared windshield, I could have been almost totally blinded.

Please don't ride with your high beams on in daytime, especially if you have very bright headlamps. You might get noticed but will not only piss other road users off but are almost certainly making it harder for them to tell what you are or what you are doing - You could just be attracting that drunk, like a moth to a candle.
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Old 11-26-2012, 03:44 PM   #29 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dfinitlydisturbd View Post
Dam police should let us run strobes in our headlights, ain't nothing catches a persons eye quicker than a three quick flashes pause three quick flashes strobe setup...don't believe me, check out how quick the lights on a police car or ambulance get your attention next time you're out and about.
you can during the day, its called a modulator

they work great, everytime i see one, i think about getting one
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Old 11-26-2012, 04:36 PM   #30 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdram View Post
you can during the day, its called a modulator

they work great, everytime i see one, i think about getting one
No, that would be a flasher may as well just run low beams and hit the pass button a few times when approaching an intersection...bout the same thing. I mean strobes, super bright flashy things like those found in the grill and on top of police cruisers there is a huge difference. I've yet to see a person whose attention isn't immediately focused on emergency vehicles with their strobes on...well excluding @$$holes with cell phones glued to their hands busily texting or yammering away instead of paying attention to what is going on around them. Been wondering just how much trouble I'd get in if I replaced my added a yelp like the one the police use right after they kick on their high beams and flashers. Would be just the thing to scare the pi$$ out brain damaged cagers. Bet they'd take a serious interest in their surroundings right quick not a full siren just the yelp.
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